• The Corrupt Elites – Anatomy of Power and Wealth in Ghana

    The Corrupt Elites is a simple and straight-forward narrative which explains the incidence of corruption in Ghana within successive historical epochs. The book argues that the Ghanaian state is sustained by a network of exclusive institutions built by the elites to facilitate the plunder of the nation’s wealth. This is because the elites are economically and politically weak to create wealth for themselves. The creation of exclusive institutions to facilitate corruption intensified from one historical epoch to another; it became a national scourge especially from the 1990s with devastating social consequences.

    The book supports this narrative about corruption with concrete and credible illustrations.

    50.00
  • The Destiny of A Horse Boy

    The Destiny of a Horse Boy, an autobiography, tells Mahama’s story of growing up as a member of the nobility in an Africa of bygone days. Raised by his grandparents, Mahama, an exceptional boy, starts life in the parched and inhospitable landscape of Northern Ghana, a far flung place that is thoughtfully, even lovingly, brought to life through the words of this prolific author.

    His hunger to go to school, to be educated, to rise above his time and place, is so powerful that he runs away from home, travelling in cars that can sometimes go no faster than eight miles an hour, in decrepit trucks, on unreliable ferries and pontoons, past menacing wild animals, ultimately to present himself at a school and beg for admission. Once accepted, he studies through school holidays, excels at nearly every undertaking, and proves himself to be a remarkable young man. At a time when the literary rates were in the single digits, Mahama goes on to become a lawyer and a politician of influence and note, thanks to his integrity and his desire to better his country and the lives of his fellow countrymen in Ghana.

    The Destiny of a Horse Boy delineates the steps from colonial rule to self-rule in Mahama’s beloved Ghana. He tells of violent, warring royal clans, the worst kinds of political jockeying and bloodshed at the hands of government lackeys, politicians and leaders who quite literally risk theirs lives in their quests for power.

    This resourceful and accomplished man has left an indelible mark on Ghana and global politics.

    60.00
  • The Ewe of Togo and Benin

    Coordinated by the West African Organisation for Research on Eweland, this publication constitutes a first and much needed English language survey of the history and cultures of the Ewe peoples in the former French colonies, Benin and Togo. The colonial legacy has meant discontinuity in the research conducted on and by the Ewe peoples in Ghana, with the Ewe peoples in the Francophone countries, a more-or-less ethnically and linguistically homogonous people.

    Hence this book aims to be a step towards re-connecting knowledge and scholarship about the Ewe across the linguistic and geographical divide in the postcolonial period. Charting the history, development, politics and economies activities of the Ewe in Benin and Togo, the work brings together new sociological, cultural, historical and linguistic data, most of which is primary research, previously unpublished in any form.

    52.00
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    The Ewe People: A Study of the Ewe People in German Togo

    The Ewe of Ghana, Togo and Benin have been one of the most documented ethnic groups in West Africa, given their encounters with the German, French and British colonial administrations. In 1906, Jakob Spieth, a German Bremen Missionary, published Die Ewe-Stamme. Die Ewe-Stamme is one of the most comprehensive treatises on the history, religion, economic life, traditional social structure, and, indeed, the entire spectrum of everyday life of the Ewe. Published over 100 years ago the book had limited circulation and became increasingly rare to the extent that it almost became a deified piece of work and source of classified knowledge. Additionally, Die Ewe-Stamme was published in German and old non-standard and colloquial Ewe languages. It is hoped this translation of Die Ewe-Stamme into English and contemporary Ewe might create a revival of interest amongst researchers, enhance the understanding for the traditional Ewe culture and become reading material in schools and universities.

    120.00150.00
  • The Fourth John: Reign, Rejection & Rebound

    An influential northern caucus is secretly meeting and grooming him to contest the man who will select him as a vice presidential candidate. A meeting between the first lady and the Brong-Ahafo caucus results in, perhaps, the fastest ministerial reshuffle in the history of the country. At 2a.m., before the breaking of a major scandal, there is a meeting between the president’s friend and the investigative journalist about how to involve the main opposition leader, in the story to minimise its damage to the president in the upcoming election. The wife of the president reports the wife of the vice president to the vice president’s mother. The night before a crucial election, the president and his main contender are locked up in a meeting with Ghana’s most revered traditional ruler.

    These and other revealing accounts on governance, policies and programmes of the fourth presidency of Ghana’s Fourth Republic are the intriguing contents of this book. Here, the journalist whose investigations are believed to have contributed to the downfall of the administration gets brutally intimate with the regime.

    Rare interviews with key figures of the governing party and historical contexts to contemporary events provide readers and students of African politics the inside story of what is considered the model democracy on the continent. The fluidity of the writing style and humour make this book about politics and governance in Ghana’s Fourth Republic both informative, educative and entertaining.

    80.00100.00
  • The Ghost of Sani Abacha

    A harassed servant plots his grim revenge (A History of Human Servitude)… Sheri puts a potential boyfriend to the test (Man Rating)… Phiri contends for his civil service career (The Fall of Phiri Bombai)…and a politician in his finest hour finds himself possessed by a begoggled demon (The Ghost of Sani Abacha)…

    26 stories of life and love in the aftermath of autocracy, delivered with wit and insight by one of Africa’s most incisive writers.

    50.00
  • The History and Description of Africa: And of the Notable Things Therein Contained Volume 1 (Cambridge Library Collection – Hakluyt First Series)

    *First published 1896

    The publications of the Hakluyt Society (founded in 1846) made available edited (and sometimes translated) early accounts of exploration. The first series, which ran from 1847 to 1899, consists of 100 books containing published or previously unpublished works by authors from Christopher Columbus to Sir Francis Drake, and covering voyages to the New World, to China and Japan, to Russia and to Africa and India. Leo Africanus (c. 1494-c. 1554) was an Arab diplomat captured by Europeans in 1518 and taken to Rome. He was later released by Pope Leo X and enjoyed papal patronage until he left Rome in 1527. This work describes the region of north Africa known as the Maghreb, and was considered the most authoritative account of the cultures, religions and politics of this region until the start of European exploration in the nineteenth century.

    Volume 1 contains a general description of North Africa.

    50.00
  • The Kwame Nkrumah Cartoons: A Visual History of the Times

    The first section of this book covers cartoons produced before the 24 February 1966 coup; and the second section covers cartoons produced after the coup. Within these two sections, the individual cartoons themselves are not arranged in any particular order. While dates are important in historical narratives, the aim of this book is to compare and contrast representations of the Ghanaian leader and other aspects of Ghanaian, African and world history during Nkrumah’s last years in power and immediately after his removal from power; to compare and contrast depictions of Nkrumah at the height of his power with depictions of Nkrumah after he was no longer in power. The pre-coup and post-coup periods are presented as distinct but overlapping historical spaces.

    30.00
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    The Man Died: Prison Notes of Wole Soyinka

    During the Nigerian Civil War (1967-1970), the Nobel Prize-winning African writer, Wole Soyinka, was arrested and incarcerated for twenty-two months, most of it spent in solitary confinement in a cell, 4ft by 8ft. His offence: assisting the Biafran secessionists.
    The Man Died, now regarded as a classic of prison literature, is a product of this experience. What comes through in the compelling narrative is the author’s uncompromising, principled stand on the universality and indivisibility of freedom and human rights.
    70.00
  • The Mind of Africa

    The Mind of Africa, written while the author was A Fellow of  All Souls College, Oxford, was a fruit of that enlarged perspective. After several years, he visited Ghana in 1962. There Kwame Nkrumah, then President of Ghana, successfully persuaded him to return to teach at the University of Ghana, Legon and he subsequently resigned from All Souls. In 1968, he went to the United States as a visiting professor. This was followed by invitations to teach at various academic institutions there, including Berkeley and Stanford. He subsequently settled in California, where he continued to teach and research philosophy in the University of California at Santa Cruz until his retirement.

    The Mind of Africa appeared at a time when a number of African countries were obtaining, or fighting for, their political freedom from their colonial rulers; and becoming independent nations expecting to build new societies in accordance with their own visions and conceptions, though not necessarily jettisoning all the features of their colonial heritage. Building new societies requires appropriate ideologies and philosophies fashioned within the crucible of their cultural and historical experiences. Thus, the relation between ideology and society is taken up at the very outset of the book… The Mind of Africa is important for Africa’s future and identity.

    55.00
  • The Persistence of Paradox: Memoirs of F.L. Bartels

    Francis Bartels is a man of many, many parts. As Headmaster of one of Ghana’s great schools, he was wisely strict and strictly wise. This excellent book shows that he has stamped his personality on fields as far apart as educational policy, linguistics and diplomacy. Yet he is also a romantic, a humorist, a family man, as well as a keen analyst of his origins and ancestry.

    Perhaps there is a certain Dutch caution in his committee work and strategic statements at educational conferences. Perhaps there is also a profound desire for order and purpose, and a liking for a job well done, which pays tribute to his German forebears. It certainly paid off at his beloved school, Mfantsipim, where Kofi Annan, current UN Secretary-General, was once his pupil.

    Perhaps there is a recognizable Englishness in Francis Bartel’s affability, his dislike of tyranny, and his respect for those fraternal connections which lighten the load of educators and administrators across the world.

    There is clearly beauty and lucidity in the prose that he uses to describe the paradoxes encountered in a long life full of varied achievements. He was honoured by the United Kingdom that helped to educate him. He was welcomed across Africa and the United States of America as a speaker on education at all levels. He was appointed as a high-ranking staff member of UNESCO and as his country’s Ambassador to the Federal Republic of Germany.

    Thus, Francis Bartels is that admirable product of the twentieth century — a citizen of the world. In his fascinating story, we see him employ all the skills and qualities mentioned above to ensure his survival in various challenging environments. And this, he will agree, is firmly rooted in h is Africanness which is inspired by his abiding vision of excellence.

    100.00
  • The Police in Ghana: 1939 – 2009

    Police in Ghana: 1939 – 2009 was written to meet the interests and needs of researchers, students taking social science and related courses at the tertiary institutions, security personnel and the general public. In the reader’s desire to learn from the past, he or she is offered the opportunity to study and analyse some developments, achievements and, generally, the role the Ghana Police played during this period.

    35.00

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