• Africa Must Unite!

    Africa Must Unite best describes what Osagyefo Kwame Nkrumah stood for.

    The mission he began over half a century ago remains uncompleted and the task of this generation is to make the dream of African unity come alive and realise our full potential as the African nation that would be embracing all peoples of African ancestry.

    Nkrumah called for the political and economic unification of African states as the most effective way to achieve economic and socio-cultural emancipation and regain full sovereignty over our land and resources.

    The thesis of Africa Unite remains unassilable, giving hope to about 1.5 billion Africans all over the world who aspire for a better life in a more humane world.

    Africa Must Unite!

    50.00
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    Africa Rise And Shine: How a Nigerian Entrepreneur from Humble Beginnings Grew a Business to $16 Billion (Hardcover)

    The road to success is rarely linear and never easy. Despite countless setbacks, Jim Ovia, founder of Zenith Bank, was able to achieve the unthinkable. Africa Rise and Shine is the story of Ovia’s business and banking success and how he was able to create one of Africa’s largest banks.

    Spanning decades of both world and Nigerian history, Africa Rise and Shine dives deep into the events that led to Ovia’s triumph. Drawing upon his educational experiences and relentless determination, Ovia was able to overcome every hurdle that stood in the way of his bank becoming the national icon that it is today. Africa Rise and Shine outlines the tough, yet necessary business decisions that were essential to Zenith’s prolonged success and is filled with valuable takeaways for every businessperson. Learn from one of the best in banking what it takes to truly be successful.

    180.00
  • Africa Writes Back: The African Writers Series & the Launch of African Literature

    June 17, 2008, is the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart by Heinemann. This publication provided the impetus for the foundation of the African Writers Series in 1962 with Chinua Achebe as the editorial adviser. This narrative, drawing liberally on the correspondence with the authors, concentrates on the adventurous first twenty-five years.

    Africa Writes Back: The African Writer’s Series & the Launch of African Literature captures the energy of literary publishing in a new and undefined field. Portraits of the leading characters and the many consultants and readers providing reports and advice to new and established writers make Africa Writes Back a stand-out book. James Currey’s voice and insights are an added bonus.

    45.00
  • African Dance in Ghana: Contemporary Transformations

    In African Dance in Ghana: Contemporary Transformations, Professor Francis Nii-Yartey tells the story of the development of dance – both traditional and contemporary – since Ghana’s independence. The book charts the people and events that influenced new forms of dance and their impact on art, culture and national identity. The dances that emerge combine centuries-old tradition with a yearning for original expression and innovation.

    Nii-Yartey is uniquely equipped to tell the story, having been directly involved through his directorship of the Department of Dance at the University of Ghana and his involvement in establishing the Ghana Dance Ensemble and the Noyam African Dance Institute.

    The second part of the book gives detailed choreographic instructions for 18 dance pieces, most of which were written, choreographed and directed by the author. They form an invaluable legacy to his career.

    40.00
  • African Traditional Leadership

    In this book, Emeritus Professor Jacob U. Gordon has brought together both historical and current literature in traditional African leadership to focus on critical issues of leadership and governance in Africa. The book sets out to provide students of African leadership and development, educators, politicians, traditional leaders and practitioners with a toolbox for understanding the changing role of traditional rulers/chiefs and its future in African life.

    It examples leadership dynamics of past African leaders such as Abu Bakr II (14th century), Chaka Zulu, Queen Hatshepsut, Hannibal of Carthage, Makeda the Queen of Sheba, King Mansa Musa, Haile Selassie and Yaa Asantewaa.

    It is the author’s hope that this book will help the reader to better understand the complexities of traditional leadership in Africa and key considerations; to appreciate the values of traditional African leadership; and to develop a better appreciation of the importance of good leadership and governance in a global and competitive world that yearns for sustainable peace and security.

    30.00
  • African Visionaries

    In over forty portraits, African writers present extraordinary people from their continent: portraits of the women and men whom they admire, people who have changed and enriched life in Africa. The portraits include inventor, founders of universities, resistance fighters, musicians, environmental activists or writers. African Visionaries is a multi-faceted book, seen through African eyes, on the most impactful people of Africa.

    Some of the writers contributing to the collection are: Helon Habila, Virginia Phiri, Ellen Banda-Aaku, Véronique Tadjo, Tendai Huchu, Solomon Tsehaye, Patrice Nganang and Sami Tchak.

    45.00
  • Akyem Abuakwa, 1700-1943: From Ofori Panin to Sir Ofori Atta (Trondheim Studies in History) [Hardcover]

    Recently-launched in hardcover format, this book by Professor Addo-Fening is an authoritatively comprehensive treasure on Akyem Abuakwa history.

    This book tells the story of Akyem Abuakwa from its origins in 17th century Adanse, through its relocation to Banso, on the backside of the Atewa Hill under Nana Ofori Panin, commonly regarded as the founder of the Akyem State, and subsequently to Kyebi, in the valley of the Birim River, after 1727; through to the interactions with the Basel Mission and social developments in the 19th and 20th centuries to the transformation of the Abuakwa economy in recent years.

    Published by Heritage Project as part of The Legacy Series.

     

    200.00
  • Ama: A Story of the Atlantic Slave Trade

    Winner of the 2002 Commonwealth Writers Prize for the Best First Book

    “I am a human being; I am a woman; I am a black woman; I am an African. Once I was free; then I was captured and became a slave; but inside me, here and here, I am still a free woman.”
    During a period of four hundred years, European slave traders ferried some 12 million enslaved Africans across the Atlantic. In the Americas, teaching a slave to read and write was a criminal offense. When the last slaves gained their freedom in Brazil, barely a thousand of them were literate. Hardly any stories of the enslaved and transported Africans have survived.
    This novel is an attempt to recreate just one of those stories, one story of a possible 12 million or more.Lawrence Hill created another in The Book of Negroes (Someone Knows my Name in the U.S.) and, more recently, Yaa Gyasi has done the same in Homegoing.

    Ama occupies center stage throughout this novel.

    As the story opens, she is sixteen. Distant drums announce the death of her grandfather. Her family departs to attend the funeral, leaving her alone to tend her ailing baby brother.

    It is 1775. Asante has conquered its northern neighbor and exacted an annual tribute of 500 slaves. The ruler of Dagbon dispatches a raiding party into the lands of the neighboring Bekpokpam. They capture Ama.

    That night, her lover, Itsho, leads an attack on the raiders’ camp. The rescue bid fails. Sent to collect water from a stream, Ama comes across Itsho’s mangled corpse. For the rest of her life she will call upon his spirit in time of need.

    In Kumase, the Asante capital, Ama is given as a gift to the Queen-mother.

    When the adolescent monarch, Osei Kwame, conceives a passion for her, the regents dispatch her to the coast for sale to the Dutch at Elmina Castle.

    There the governor, Pieter de Bruyn, selects her as his concubine, dressing her in the elegant clothes of his late Dutch wife and instructing the obese chaplain to teach her to read and write English.

    De Bruyn plans to marry Ama and take her with him to Europe. He makes a last trip to the Dutch coastal outstations and returns infected with yellow fever. On his death, his successor rapes Ama and sends her back to the female dungeon. Traumatized, her mind goes blank.

    She comes to her senses in the canoe which takes her and other women out to the slave ship, The Love of Liberty.

    Before the ship leaves the coast of Africa, Ama instigates a slave rebellion. It fails and a brutal whipping leaves her blind in one eye.

    The ship is becalmed in mid-Atlantic. Then a fierce storm cripples it and drives it into the port of Salvador, capital of Brazil.

    Ama finds herself working in the fields and the mill on a sugar estate. She is absorbed into slave society and begins to adapt, learning Portuguese.

    Years pass. Ama is now totally blind. Clutching the cloth which is her only material link with Africa, she reminisces, dozes, falls asleep.

    A short epilogue brings the story up to date. The consequences of the slave trade and slavery are still with us. Brazilians of African descent remain entrenched in the lower reaches of society, enmeshed in poverty.

    “This is story telling on a grand scale,” writes Tony Simões da Silva. “In Ama, Herbstein creates a work of literature that celebrates the resilience of human beings while denouncing the inscrutable nature of their cruelty. By focusing on the brutalization of Ama’s body, and on the psychological scars of her experiences, Herbstein dramatizes the collective trauma of slavery through the story of a single African woman. Ama echoes the views of writers, historians and philosophers of the African diaspora who have argued that the phenomenon of slavery is inextricable from the deepest foundations of contemporary western civilization.”

    55.00
  • Ancient Royal Tales from Ghana for Children

    Age Range: 6 – 15 years

    This book teaches children the history of some ancient Ghanaian Kings and Queens. Agokoli of the Ewes, Osei Tutu I of the Asante, Dode Akaibi of the Ga and Ndewura Jakpa of the Gonja are some of the royals featured here.

    A long, long time ago, various kings and queens ruled over the peoples in the areas of West Africa that became the Gold Coast when Europeans came and colonised them. These kings and queens were famous among their own and other tribes. Often, the kings and queens that were infamous for being cruel were the ones whose stories traveled widest.

    Some were famous for being fearless warriors who, at the slightest excuse, fought wars with their neighbours and expanded their territories. Others were famous because they liked to behead their opponents. Some others were famous because they had a union which was ‘magically’ created in which every subject was his brother’s keeper. These kings and queens were all famous for one reason or the other.

    All in all, we have a rich culture of royalty in Ghana. This book will take you on a trip through our royal history and will teach you lessons of bravery, honour, honesty and brotherhood.

    25.00
  • Angie (Boardbook)

    Age Range: 6 months – 2  years

    This board book for babies celebrates baby Angie and her day. Join Angie as she goes through her day in Ghana, enjoying her meals and interacting with family, friends and her environment.

    17.00
  • Are You Not A Nigerian? Thoughts on a Nation at Crossroads

    *Available from 15th September 2019.

    Are You Not A Nigerian? chronicles a country’s fourth attempt at democratic governance after many years of military dictatorship. Through his personal experiences and observations, Báyọ̀ Olúpohùndà captures the reality of Nigeria’s socio-political environment at the turn of the millennium, the collapse of dignity in service, and the ubiquitous “Nigerian factor” that creates entitlement.

    Are You Not A Nigerian? examines the lost opportunities, the disappointment of successive administrations, and the dilemma of a nation at a crossroads.

    60.00
  • Around Ghana: Mmo Ne Yɔ Otumfuo Osei Tutu II (Souvenir Issue, 1999)

    A collector’s item. A souvenir issue of the popular Around Ghana Magazine, to commemorate the installation of the Asantehene Otumfuo Osei Tutu II. Published in 1999. With some memorable pictures of Barima Kwaku Dua (before and when he became Asantehene) and key Asante relics and symbols.

    Contents

    Front piece

    The Making of Otumfuo Osei Tutu II

    The Life and Times of Barima Kwaku Dua

    A Bird’s Eye View of Modern Asante

    30.00

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