• Death and Pain: Rawlings’ Ghana – The Inside Story

    “On 30 December 1981, the Ghana Armed Forces held a party at the Ministry of Defence at Burma Camp. The President, Dr. Hilla Limann, had been invited, but because of the security situation in the country he was advised not to attend. Around 3 p.m. the President changed his mind and decided to attend the party. It was not until around midnight that he returned to his official residence at the Castle.

    “Around this time, 10 soldiers, some retired, all other ranks, gathered some two miles to the south of the Camp waiting for grenades and other ammunition from their accomplices at the First Infantry Battalion at Michel Camp, about 20 miles to the East of their position. They never turned up. At about 2 a.m. on 31 December 1981, the small group decided to move. Their objective: to seize the country and form a new government.

    “Leaving the Labadi beach in the neighbourhood of the Teshie Military Range, the handful of coupmakers moved through the bush to the Recce Cookhouse. Among them were C.C. Addae, Matthew Adabuga, Gbofah, Braimah, Alidu Gyiwah, Sammy Amedeka and Allieu. Jerry Rawlings was already in Burma Camp hiding in the room of Adabuga at the Gondar Barracks…”

    Do you want a first-hand account from the murderers of the 3 judges and officer whilst they were in Nsawam Prison waiting to be executed by firing squad? Do you want to see the list of Ghanaians who went ‘missing’ during the Revolution? A relevant piece of Ghana history is in this book.

     

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  • Dreams From My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance

    Before Barack Obama became a politician, he was, among other things, a writer. Dreams from My Father is a masterpiece: a refreshing, revealing portrait of a young man asking the big questions about identity and belonging.

    The son of a black African father and a white American mother, President Obama recounts an emotional odyssey, retracing the migration of his mother’s family from Kansas to Hawaii, then to his childhood home in Indonesia. Finally he travels to Kenya, where he confronts the bitter truth of his father’s life and at last reconciles his divided inheritance.

    Written at the age of thirty-three, Dreams from My Father is an unforgettable read. It illuminates not only Obama’s journey, but also our universal desire to understand our history, and what makes us the people we are.

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  • Selected Speeches of Dr. K. A. Busia: Prime Minister of Ghana (1969-1972)

    This is a compendium of speeches by Dr. K.A. Busia, a world-renowned politician and scholar, Africa’s first Leader of Parliamentary Opposition in an independent country south of the Sahara and Prime Minister of Ghana (1969-1972).

    His commitment to multiparty democracy is demonstrated throughout the pages. For example, he objected strongly to the decision to turn Ghana  into a one-party state in the First Republic, saying, “One-party rule for Ghana, in the light of our traditions, is a step backward from the accumulated wisdom we inherited from our ancestors.”

    Today, one-party rule is a taboo to the Ghanaian constitution and Busia’s preferred economic and governance modules have become the bedrock for governance, demonstrating the continuing relevance of his ideas to contemporary politics.

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  • Dare Not Linger: The Presidential Years (Hardcover)

    The long-awaited second volume of Nelson Mandela’s memoirs, left unfinished at his death and never before available, are here completed and expanded with notes and speeches written by Mandela during his historic presidency, making for a moving sequel to his worldwide bestseller Long Walk to Freedom.
     
    “I have discovered the secret that after climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb. I have taken a moment here to rest, to steal a view of the glorious vista that surrounds me, to look back on the distance I have come. But I can rest only for a moment, for with freedom comes responsibilities, and I dare not linger, for my long walk is not ended.”
     
    In 1994, Nelson Mandela became the first president of a democratic South Africa. From the outset, he was committed to serving only a single five-year term. During his presidency, he and his government ensured that all of South Africa’s citizens became equal before the law, and he laid the foundation for turning a country riven by centuries of colonialism and apartheid into a fully functioning democracy.
     
    Dare Not Linger is the story of Mandela’s presidential years, drawing heavily on the memoir he began to write as he prepared to leave office, but was unable to finish. Now the acclaimed South African writer Mandla Langa has completed the task, using Mandela’s unfinished draft, detailed notes that Mandela made as events were unfolding, and a wealth of unseen archival material. With a prologue by Mandela’s widow, Graça Machel, the result is a vivid and often inspirational account of Mandela’s presidency and the creation of a new democracy. It tells the story of a country in transition and the challenges Mandela faced as he strove to make his vision for a liberated South Africa a reality.
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  • Hilla Limann: Scholar, Diplomat, Statesman – A Biography

    Prof Ivan Addae-Mensah’s biography of Dr. Hilla Limann is a masterpiece.  It comprehensively fills a gap in a period of our history that not much has been written on. For those scholars, students, politicians, researchers, interested in the governance, political history, economic development and international relations of Ghana, this is a must read. — His Excellency D.K. Osei (Former Ghana Ambassador to Denmark and the Scandinavian Countries, Former Secretary to Ex- President J.A. Kufuor and Diplomat in Residence, Legon Centre for International Affairs and Diplomacy) 

    The greatest value of this biography lies in the fact that this is a contribution by a person who was first and foremost a friend, and also worked closely with him before, during and after his presidency. Addae-Mensah’s Hilla Limann validates the ancestral saying that: “life is lived but understood backwards.” It contributes toward finding leadership and governance in Africa. To be African is to derive pain from this biography. It shocks and traumatizes. Who are we? Was independence worth it? What was the struggle about and for? Reading this biography shows the urgent need for an energizing vision to get rid of the demons of despair and redeem the worth of Africa for Africans. — Nana Kobina Nketsia V (Senior Lecturer in History, University of Cape Coast and Omanhen of Essikado Traditional Area) 

    We should honour those who have laboured hard for Ghana and not for self. It is no use preaching against corruption when those who are not corrupt have nothing but penury to show when they leave office. The example of Dr Limann would be of no avail unless it strengthens our will to establish an appropriate pension for retired presidents. — Ambassador K.B. Asante (Public Servant, Diplomat, Educationist, Politician)

     

     

     

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  • 1947 – 1957: The Story of Ghana’s Independence (Pre-order)

    **Available on August 4th**

    Ghana, a former colony of Great Britain, made history on March 6, 1957, when it became the first country in Sub-Saharan Africa to gain its independence. There have been many accounts of the story of Ghana’s independence by scholars, protagonists and observers alike. In this book, the author revisits the story and in a year by year account from 1947 to 1957 when the first Prime Minister, Kwame Nkrumah, declared Ghana’s independence, highlighting some of the key events that drove the struggle.

    The book also examines in detail the role played by individuals whose names have come to be associated with the struggle as an attempt to settle the old question of individuals in political change with Ghana as the case study.

    It is written with the perspective of a journalist and historian.

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  • Gandhi 1914-1948: The Years That Changed the World (Gandhi #2)

    The second and concluding volume of the magisterial biography that began with the acclaimed, Gandhi Before India: the definitive portrait of the life and work of one of the most abidingly influential–and controversial–men in world history.

    This volume opens with Mohandas Gandhi’s arrival in Bombay in January 1915 and takes us through his epic struggles over the next three decades: to deliver India from British rule, to forge harmonious relations between India’s Hindu and Muslim populations, to end the pernicious Hindu practice of untouchability, and to develop India’s economic and moral self-reliance. We see how in each of these campaigns, Gandhi adapted methods of nonviolence–strikes, marches, fasts–that successfully challenged British authority, religious orthodoxy, social customs, and would influence non-violent, revolutionary movements throughout the world. In reconstructing Gandhi’s life and work, Ramachandra Guha has drawn on sixty different archival collections, the most significant among them, a previously unavailable collection of papers belonging to Gandhi himself. Using this wealth of material, Guha creates a portrait of Gandhi and of those closest to him — family, friends, political and social leaders–that illuminates the complexity inside his thinking, his motives, his actions and their outcomes as he engaged with every important aspect of social and public life in the India of his time.

    130.00
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  • Che Guevara Reader: Writings on Politics and Revolution

    Recognized as one of Time Magazine’s ‘icons of the 20th century, Che Guevara became a legend in his own time and now has re-emerged as a symbol of a new generation of political activists. Far more than a guerrilla strategist, Che Guevara made a profound and lasting contribution to revolutionary theory and Marxist humanism as demonstrated in this best selling Reader.

     

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    The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Empire

    For more than 80 years, the Soviet Empire cast an ever-lengthening shadow across the face of the world. Lenin’s ruthless legacy consumed Eastern Europe and toppled governments on virtually every continent. Yet at the moment when the Empire appeared to have reached its zenith, it collapsed like a house of cards.

    “Brian Crozier’s definitive history of the Soviet Empire is a chilling account of an ideology that haunted our century.” — Henry Kissinger

    In this seminal work, the eminent British writer and historian Brian Crozier tells the brutal history of the Soviet Empire—its birth, life, and sudden death. The book begins at the beginning, in 1917, when the oversized dreams of Lenin and the happenstance of events conspired to change the course of history. In meticulous detail, Crozier follows the Soviet conquests across Europe and into Asia, Africa, and the Western Hemisphere. He uses recently declassified information from Soviet archives to add texture and depth to familiar parts of the story—the betrayal at Yalta, the terror of Stalin, the tragedy of Hungary, the split with China, the false hope of Prague Spring, the rise of Castro, the invasion of Afghanistan, and the crumbling of the Berlin Wall. Revealed along the way is the dark underside of a regime whose march toward supremacy resulted in the loss of tens of millions of lives. The book concludes with reflections on the extraordinary disintegration of Lenin’s utopia and the seemingly endless chaos left in its wake.

    Provocative, comprehensive, and majestic in scope, The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Empire is the definitive account of history’s most turbulent days.

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    In Search of Enemies: A CIA Story

    “[The United States’ goal in Angola] was not to keep out the Cubans and Soviets but to make their imperial efforts as costly as possible to prove that, after Vietnam, we were still capable of response, however insane. It is the story that has been told, and in impressive and convincing detail, by John Stockwell, the former chief of the CIA’s Angola ‘task force.’ His book should not be missed. Since strategic thought survives by ignoring experience, it has a highly professional interest in avoiding accounts such as this. By the same token, all who are alarmed about the tendency toward such strategic thinking should strongly welcome Mr. Stockwell’s book.” ―John Kenneth Galbraith, New York Review of Books

    In Search of Enemies is much more than the story of the only war to be found when the CIA sought to recoup its prestige after the Vietnam debacle. Though no American troops were committed to Angola, only “advisors,” many millions were spent, many thousands died, and many lies were told to the American people, in waging a war without purpose to American vital interests and without hope of victory.

    This book is useful for researchers & journalists interested in uncovering information about the conduct of US foreign policy in Africa & Asia. For example, the book tells of a CIA officer having Patrice Lumumba’s body in his car trunk one night in then Elizabethville, Congo. Stockwell mentions in a footnote that at the time he didn’t know the CIA was documented as having repeatedly tried to arrange Lumumba’s assassination. His concerns were that, although many CIA colleagues had integrity, the organization harmed national security & its secret wars harmed innocents.

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    Greatest Speeches of Historic Black Leaders – Volume 1

    The words you habitually choose affect what you experience. The control of your habitual vocabulary will ultimately change the quality of your life. Greatest Speeches of Historic Black Leaders, Vol One is a compendium of thought-provoking and inspirational multiple speeches of such prominent leaders as Martin Luther King Jr., Barack Obama, Nelson Mandela and Jesse Jackson.

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    The Man Who Changed the World: The Lives of Mikhail S. Gorbachev (Hardcover)

    “Each new book on Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev removes more of the mystery that surrounds this extraordinary man’s life. Now Gail Sheehy has removed a lot more, finding new sources of information—right down to the ‘girl next door’ in Gorbachev’s village… A wealth of good writing, fascinating anecdotes and telling details.” — Los Angeles Times

    He is one of the most dynamic and least understood leaders of the world: a winner of the Nobel Prize for Peace, yet a dedicated Communist able to crush budding independence movements by brute force. Applauded by the West for his dismantling of Cold War barriers, his denounced by his own countrymen as the destroyer of the Soviet system itself. Here for the first time is a compelling personal portrait of Mikhail Gorbachev—from the events that shaped his boyhood to the forces that now drive him as the First Man of Kremlin.

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