• Ghana: The Autobiography of Kwame Nkrumah

    The moving, human story of Kwame Nkrumah’s life from childhood to his dynamic leadership of the liberation struggle and the attainment of Ghana’s independence in 1957.

    A personal account of the African liberation struggle, this book was first published on March 6, 1957, to mark the day of Ghana’s Independence, a day which signalled the launching of the wider Pan-African struggle for the liberation of the entire African continent. As the leader of the movement for independence, Nkrumah provides an illuminating discussion of the problems and conflicts along the way to political freedom, and the new prospects beyond.

    This book is essential for understanding the genesis of the African Revolution and the maturing of one of its outstanding leaders.

    250.00
  • Never Say Die! The Autobiography of a Ghanaian Statesman

    Nyaho Nyaho-Tamakloe has been many things. In this insightful text, Nyaho takes us on a journey through his life, from his childhood in pre-independence Accra, to the year 2013, following Ghana’s seminal encounter with the ballot box in December 2012. His candid and thought-provoking narrative reflects meaningfully on significant (but often forgotten) socio-political events in Ghana. We share in Nyaho’s sobering experiences in some of Ghana’s prisons and detention centres as an inmate. We share in his tumultuous experiences as a football administrator in Ghana. We are also exposed to some of the dynamics that have influenced contemporary politics in Ghana, including the 2012 parliamentary and presidential elections.

    200.00
  • K. A. Busia: A Symbol of Democracy – Exploration of His Life and Words (Hardcover)

    This book is an indispensable resource! It is an account of the life and works of Kofi Abrefa Busia, a world-renowned scholar and politician whose story is inextricably merged with that of Ghana.

    “No one can doubt that the life and thoughts of Dr Busia will always feature prominently in the history of Africa, the Commonwealth and the wider world. We can be confident that, in the years that lie ahead, his importance will become increasingly evident. As thinker, teacher and statesman, he was an outstanding leader.” — St Antony’s College, Oxford University, UK

    “The life of Kofi Abrefa Busia occupies a fascinating spot in the history of Ghana as a result of the intellectual and good governance legacy he left behind, having served as Ghana’s Prime Minister of the 2nd Republic. It is this legacy, and the vision that preceded it, which has motivated the publication of this book. The book gives us much to think about, and things to still consider in Ghana’s development.” — John Agyekum Kufuor, President of the Republic of Ghana (2001-2008)

    200.00
  • Revolutionary Path

    This book was compiled during the last two years of the author’s life. It was begun in response to many requests for a single volume which would contain key documents, some of them previously unpublished, which would illustrate landmarks in his career as a leading theorist and activist of the world socialist revolutionary struggle.

    Among the documents included in Parts One and Two are Editorials from the Accra Evening News, What I Mean by Positive Action, The Motion of Destiny, The Dawn Broadcast, and the full text of other important speeches and broadcasts. Introductory sections to each document provide further insight into the political thinking of this great revolutionary Pan Africanist.

    180.00
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    Dare Not Linger: The Presidential Years (Hardcover)

    The long-awaited second volume of Nelson Mandela’s memoirs, left unfinished at his death and never before available, are here completed and expanded with notes and speeches written by Mandela during his historic presidency, making for a moving sequel to his worldwide bestseller Long Walk to Freedom.
     
    “I have discovered the secret that after climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb. I have taken a moment here to rest, to steal a view of the glorious vista that surrounds me, to look back on the distance I have come. But I can rest only for a moment, for with freedom comes responsibilities, and I dare not linger, for my long walk is not ended.”
     
    In 1994, Nelson Mandela became the first president of a democratic South Africa. From the outset, he was committed to serving only a single five-year term. During his presidency, he and his government ensured that all of South Africa’s citizens became equal before the law, and he laid the foundation for turning a country riven by centuries of colonialism and apartheid into a fully functioning democracy.
     
    Dare Not Linger is the story of Mandela’s presidential years, drawing heavily on the memoir he began to write as he prepared to leave office, but was unable to finish. Now the acclaimed South African writer Mandla Langa has completed the task, using Mandela’s unfinished draft, detailed notes that Mandela made as events were unfolding, and a wealth of unseen archival material. With a prologue by Mandela’s widow, Graça Machel, the result is a vivid and often inspirational account of Mandela’s presidency and the creation of a new democracy. It tells the story of a country in transition and the challenges Mandela faced as he strove to make his vision for a liberated South Africa a reality.
    170.00
  • Fear: Trump in the White House – Hardcover

    “Explosive.”—The Washington Post
    “Devastating.”—The New Yorker
    “Unprecedented.”—CNN

    THE INSIDE STORY ON PRESIDENT TRUMP, AS ONLY BOB WOODWARD CAN TELL IT

    With authoritative reporting honed through eight presidencies from Nixon to Obama, author Bob Woodward reveals in unprecedented detail the harrowing life inside President Donald Trump’s White House and precisely how he makes decisions on major foreign and domestic policies. Woodward draws from hundreds of hours of interviews with firsthand sources, meeting notes, personal diaries, files and documents. The focus is on the explosive debates and the decision-making in the Oval Office, the Situation Room, Air Force One and the White House residence.

    Fear is the most intimate portrait of a sitting president ever published during the president’s first years in office.

    160.00
  • Rhodesia File

    Kwame Nkrumah intended to write on the Zimbabwean struggle. This book contains key documents from the file on Rhodesia which he opened after U.D.I. in 1965. The letters and papers, many of which are published for the first time here, show the thinking of Nkrumah on the problem of minority regimes in Africa. How accurate it was, as subsequent events have proved. A connecting narrative and chronology from 1887 have been added by the publishers.

    150.00

    Rhodesia File

    150.00
  • Neo-Colonialism: The Last Stage of Imperialism

    This is the book which, when first published in 1965, caused such an uproar in the US State Department that a sharp note of protest was sent to Kwame Nkrumah, and the $25million of American “aid” to Ghana was promptly cancelled. It exposes the working of international monopoly capitalism in Africa and shows how the stranglehold of foreign monopolies perpetuates the paradox of Africa: poverty in the midst of plenty.

    150.00
  • Challenge of the Congo: A Case Study of Foreign Pressures in an Independent State

    With Author’s Note written in Conakry. An account of a crucial period in the history of the Republic of Congo by one of the heads of state most closely involved. New light is thrown on Katanga’s secession, the failure of the UN operation, the murder of Lumumba, foreign military intervention at Stanleyville (Kisangani) and the seizure of power by Mobutu. A most valuable and unusual feature is the publication of contemporary diplomatic records on which future historical analysis will be based.

     

    150.00
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    For the Record

    ‘The political memoir of the decade’ Sunday Times

    The referendum on Britain’s membership of the EU is one of the most controversial political events of our times. For the first time, the man who called that vote talks about the decision and its origins, as well as giving a candid account of his time at the top of British politics.

    David Cameron was Conservative Party leader during the largest financial crash in living memory. The Arab Spring and the Eurozone crisis both started during his first year as prime minister. The backdrop to his time in office included the advent of ISIS, surging migration and a rapidly changing EU.

    Here he talks about how he confronted those challenges, from modernising a party that had suffered three successive electoral defeats to forming the first coalition government for seventy years. He sets out how he helped turn around Britain’s economy, implementing a modern, compassionate agenda that included education and welfare reform, the legalisation of gay marriage, the referendum on Scottish independence and world-leading environmental policies.

    David Cameron is searingly honest about the key players from his time in politics. And he is frank about himself – the things he got right and the things he got wrong. He opens up about family life too, including the tragic loss of his eldest son.

    We learn why he kept Britain’s promise on overseas aid spending and what it was like to commit British troops to conflicts in Libya, Iraq and Syria. He sets out how he won the first outright Conservative majority in nearly a quarter of a century, and describes the events leading up to the EU referendum, the renegotiation, the campaign – and his thoughts on it all today.

    It is the most compelling record yet of what it’s like to lead in modern times and to live behind the most famous door in the world.

    150.00

    For the Record

    150.00
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    Digital Democracy, Analogue Politics: How the Internet Era is Transforming Kenya

    From the upheavals of recent national elections to the success of the #MyDressMyChoice feminist movement, digital platforms have already had a dramatic impact on political life in Kenya – one of the most electronically advanced countries in Africa. While the impact of the Digital Age on Western politics has been extensively debated, there is still little appreciation of how it has been felt in developing countries such as Kenya, where Twitter, Facebook, WhatsApp and other online platforms are increasingly a part of everyday life.

    Written by a respected Kenyan activist and researcher at the forefront of political online struggles, this book presents a unique contribution to the debate on digital democracy. For traditionally marginalised groups, particularly women and people with disabilities, digital spaces have allowed Kenyans to build new communities which transcend old ethnic and gender divisions. But the picture is far from wholly positive.

    Digital Democracy, Analogue Politics explores the drastic efforts being made by elites to contain online activism, as well as how ‘fake news’, a failed digital vote-counting system and the incumbent president’s recruitment of Cambridge Analytica contributed to tensions around the 2017 elections. Reframing digital democracy from the African perspective, Nyabola’s ground-breaking work opens up new ways of understanding our current global online era.

    150.00
  • Truth Without Reconciliation: A Human Rights History of Ghana (Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights)

    *Available from 10 December, 2019

    Although truth and reconciliation commissions are supposed to generate consensus and unity in the aftermath of political violence, Abena Ampofoa Asare identifies cacophony as the most valuable and overlooked consequence of this process in Ghana. By collecting and preserving the voices of a diverse cross-section of the national population, Ghana’s National Reconciliation Commission (2001-2004) created an unprecedented public archive of postindependence political history as told by the self-described victims of human rights abuse.

    The collected voices in the archives of this truth commission expand Ghana’s historic record by describing the state violence that seeped into the crevices of everyday life, shaping how individuals and communities survived the decades after national independence. Here, victims of violence marshal the language of international human rights to assert themselves as experts who both mourn the past and articulate the path toward future justice.

    There are, however, risks as well as rewards for dredging up this survivors’ history of Ghana. The revealed truth of Ghana’s human rights history is the variety and dissonance of suffering voices. These conflicting and conflicted records make it plain that the pursuit of political reconciliation requires, first, reckoning with a violence that is not past but is preserved in national institutions and individual lives. By exploring the challenge of human rights testimony as both history and politics, Asare charts a new course in evaluating the success and failures of truth and reconciliation commissions in Africa and around the world.

    140.00

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