• The Bold New Normal: Creating The Africa Where Everyone Prospers

    Have you ever wondered what it will take to transform each African country into a prosperous nation where each citizen has a real opportunity to thrive? Africa’s narrative has been shaped by a vision of the future that remains bleak. A vision that says a little more is okay for the African. It is time to challenge and change our paradigm of what great outcomes look like for an African country.

    It is time for The Bold New Normal of an Africa where citizens of each country genuinely have the opportunity to prosper.

    The formula for sustainable prosperity has been tried and tested world over. Why then do we continue to hope that a different method, that has thus far failed the continent, will create sustainable prosperity?

    The Bold New Normal is a timely publication that coincides with the 400th anniversary of the start of slavery: the year of return. 400 years since the unraveling of African began, it is time to piece her back together and focus forward. It is surely the time for The Bold New Normal!

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  • Death and Pain: Rawlings’ Ghana – The Inside Story

    “On 30 December 1981, the Ghana Armed Forces held a party at the Ministry of Defence at Burma Camp. The President, Dr. Hilla Limann, had been invited, but because of the security situation in the country he was advised not to attend. Around 3 p.m. the President changed his mind and decided to attend the party. It was not until around midnight that he returned to his official residence at the Castle.

    “Around this time, 10 soldiers, some retired, all other ranks, gathered some two miles to the south of the Camp waiting for grenades and other ammunition from their accomplices at the First Infantry Battalion at Michel Camp, about 20 miles to the East of their position. They never turned up. At about 2 a.m. on 31 December 1981, the small group decided to move. Their objective: to seize the country and form a new government.

    “Leaving the Labadi beach in the neighbourhood of the Teshie Military Range, the handful of coupmakers moved through the bush to the Recce Cookhouse. Among them were C.C. Addae, Matthew Adabuga, Gbofah, Braimah, Alidu Gyiwah, Sammy Amedeka and Allieu. Jerry Rawlings was already in Burma Camp hiding in the room of Adabuga at the Gondar Barracks…”

    Do you want a first-hand account from the murderers of the 3 judges and officer whilst they were in Nsawam Prison waiting to be executed by firing squad? Do you want to see the list of Ghanaians who went ‘missing’ during the Revolution? A relevant piece of Ghana history is in this book.

     

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  • I Speak of Ghana

    It’s a rare person who can be both funny and wise at the same time. Yet that is exactly the way to describe Nana Awere Damoah’s writings in this small but compelling short story collection about contemporary life in Ghana. In it the reader will find Ghanaman in traffic, or Ghanawoman paying the corrupt policeman. Either way, one knows these are the words of a master story teller who handily blurs the lines between laughing so hard it makes one cry, or crying so hard it makes one laugh.

    I Speak of Ghana is an honest journey of deft oration replete with the sounds (from the harmonious to the cacophonic), smells (including the pleasant and unpleasant), sights (from the eye-catching to the embarrassing), frustrations, triumphs and the mundane – everything that makes the Ghanaian experience finds its way into this book. Unlike the typical ranting about Ghanaian situations, Nana performs an insightful examination of the heart of the matter. Dissimilar to empty praise, Nana thoroughly embraces the issues that give us hope as people connected to Ghana. Narrated with humor, the book is Nana’s eloquence at its best.

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  • Unforgettable: Living a Life That Matters

    We all know someday we wouldn’t be here anymore. Not necessarily dying but we won’t be where we are forever. We will move on someday. We might leave our positions for someone to occupy. We might even take the final bow out of life. When that day comes, most of us wouldn’t like to go like the flicker—without a trace. We would like to leave behind something that says “we were here.” We would like to be remembered and somehow, we all would like to be missed.

    In Unforgettable, Nesta Jojoe Erskine walks you through the subtle art of leaving a trace on the grounds that you walk. Drawing on the amazing life stories and lessons of people who have been able to leave their mark, Nesta exposes the forgotten little things in life one has to do to leave a mark on the hearts of people they have dealings with.  In the end, you’ll realize that you don’t have to be Dr. Kwame Nkrumah or Mother Teresa or Martin Luther King Jr. before you can leave a mark.

    Your life, however brief it may be, if it’s lived well, you too can leave your mark and be Unforgettable.

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  • The Trial of J.J. Rawlings: Echoes of the 31st December Revolution (2nd Edition)

    The Trial of JJ Rawlings narrates the extraordinary circumstances under which a young military officer Flt Lt JJ Rawlings, later to become the longest serving Head of State of Ghana, shot into the limelight to change the course of Ghana’s history and political development.The first edition of the book, originally published in 1986, completely sold out within a year, making this second edition very welcome in response to public request.

    This volume is a valuable contribution to our understanding of those ineluctable forces that have changed the contours of our society. Surely, the story of JJ, well told in this volume, cannot fail to grip and hold the reader’s most concentrated attention. – Prof F.A. Botchwey, PhD

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  • From Third World to First: Singapore and the Asian Economic Boom

    Few gave tiny Singapore much chance of survival when it was granted independence in 1965. How is it, then, that today the former British colonial trading post is a thriving Asian metropolis with not only the world’s number one airline, best airport, and busiest port of trade, but also the world’s fourth–highest per capita real income?

    The story of that transformation is told here by Singapore’s charismatic, controversial founding father, Lee Kuan Yew. Rising from a legacy of divisive colonialism, the devastation of the Second World War, and general poverty and disorder following the withdrawal of foreign forces, Singapore now is hailed as a city of the future. This miraculous history is dramatically recounted by the man who not only lived through it all but who fearlessly forged ahead and brought about most of these changes.

    Delving deep into his own meticulous notes, as well as previously unpublished government papers and official records, Lee details the extraordinary efforts it took for an island city–state in Southeast Asia to survive at that time.

    Lee explains how he and his cabinet colleagues finished off the communist threat to the fledgling state’s security and began the arduous process of nation building: forging basic infrastructural roads through a land that still consisted primarily of swamps, creating an army from a hitherto racially and ideologically divided population, stamping out the last vestiges of colonial–era corruption, providing mass public housing, and establishing a national airline and airport.

    In this illuminating account, Lee writes frankly about his trenchant approach to political opponents and his often unorthodox views on human rights, democracy, and inherited intelligence, aiming always “to be correct, not politically correct.” Nothing in Singapore escaped his watchful eye: whether choosing shrubs for the greening of the country, restoring the romance of the historic Raffles Hotel, or openly, unabashedly persuading young men to marry women as well educated as themselves. Today’s safe, tidy Singapore bears Lee’s unmistakable stamp, for which he is unapologetic: “If this is a nanny state, I am proud to have fostered one.”

    Though Lee’s domestic canvas in Singapore was small, his vigor and talent assured him a larger place in world affairs. With inimitable style, he brings history to life with cogent analyses of some of the greatest strategic issues of recent times and reveals how, over the years, he navigated the shifting tides of relations among America, China, and Taiwan, acting as confidant, sounding board, and messenger for them. He also includes candid, sometimes acerbic pen portraits of his political peers, including the indomitable Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan, the poetry–spouting Jiang Zemin, and ideologues George Bush and Deng Xiaoping.

    Lee also lifts the veil on his family life and writes tenderly of his wife and stalwart partner, Kwa Geok Choo, and of their pride in their three children –– particularly the eldest son, Hsien Loong, who is now Singapore’s deputy prime minister.

    For more than three decades, Lee Kuan Yew has been praised and vilified in equal measure, and he has established himself as a force impossible to ignore in Asian and international politics. From Third World to First offers readers a compelling glimpse into this visionary’s heart, soul, and mind.

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  • Kwame Nkrumah: The Great African

    Most books on Kwame Nkrumah have been written with the adult in mind. This biography, however, has been written specially for the young reader. The aim is to trace the development of this unforgettable son of Africa from childhood to adulthood — his beliefs, achievements and contribution to the liberation of Africa from colonial rule.

    We have also tried to explain his place in the history of the world. Students in schools and teacher training colleges as well as young readers would find this volume very captivating and full of insight.

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  • The Corrupt Elites – Anatomy of Power and Wealth in Ghana

    The Corrupt Elites is a simple and straight-forward narrative which explains the incidence of corruption in Ghana within successive historical epochs. The book argues that the Ghanaian state is sustained by a network of exclusive institutions built by the elites to facilitate the plunder of the nation’s wealth. This is because the elites are economically and politically weak to create wealth for themselves. The creation of exclusive institutions to facilitate corruption intensified from one historical epoch to another; it became a national scourge especially from the 1990s with devastating social consequences.

    The book supports this narrative about corruption with concrete and credible illustrations.

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  • The Trial of J.J. Rawlings: Echoes of the 31st December Revolution (1st Edition)

    The Trial of J.J. Rawlings is a fascinating book about a most fascinating period of Ghana’s history, at the centre of which stands the fascinating personality of J.J. Rawlings. This book was a sensation when it was published thirty-two years ago. It was a bestseller in Ghana and a most sought-after book by Ghanaians everywhere as well as people who, for whatever reason, had an interest in Ghana. This is because the book unlocked (or at least tried to unlock) the enigma of Jerry John Rawlings to the extent that it was possible so to do.

    Almost a complete generation later, the book is even more relevant today than when it was first published; the story of Jerry Rawlings and the period of the AFRC and early PNDC periods remains only partially told. Indeed, the social and economic dynamics that produced June 4th have also receded into the mists of time, and with them the man at the centre of this tale. Therefore, the story this book tells has acquired a new urgency and become a national requirement.

    NANA KWASI GYAN-APENTENG
    CHAIRMAN, NATIONAL MEDIA COMMISSION

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  • Dark Days in Ghana

    The final book by Kwame Nkrumah, Ghana’s first President, this records his experiences after he was over thrown in a coup d’etat.

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  • Things Every Child of Ghana Should Know About Dr. J.B. Danquah

    Age Range: 8 years upwards
    He had a beautiful wife called Elizabeth
    He had sixteen children
    He was a lawyer
    He was a scholar
    He loved to eat sausages
    He was a chief
    He wrote several books
    He could work at his typewriter all night…
    This biography of the man, described as the “doyen of Gold Coast politics” by the Watson Commission of Inquiry into the 1948 Accra riots, written for children, gives an insight into the very full life of a man who was not only a politician, but also many other things.
    Parents and children will enjoy reading and learning together about Dr. J.B. Danquah.
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  • Jennifer Goes to the Library

    Age Range: 2 – 5  years

    Jennifer lives in Accra, Ghana. She likes to read storybooks at the Mamprobi Gale Community Library where her mother, Joyce Yeboah, works as a librarian.

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