• I Speak of Ghana

    It’s a rare person who can be both funny and wise at the same time. Yet that is exactly the way to describe Nana Awere Damoah’s writings in this small but compelling short story collection about contemporary life in Ghana. In it the reader will find Ghanaman in traffic, or Ghanawoman paying the corrupt policeman. Either way, one knows these are the words of a master story teller who handily blurs the lines between laughing so hard it makes one cry, or crying so hard it makes one laugh.

    I Speak of Ghana is an honest journey of deft oration replete with the sounds (from the harmonious to the cacophonic), smells (including the pleasant and unpleasant), sights (from the eye-catching to the embarrassing), frustrations, triumphs and the mundane – everything that makes the Ghanaian experience finds its way into this book. Unlike the typical ranting about Ghanaian situations, Nana performs an insightful examination of the heart of the matter. Dissimilar to empty praise, Nana thoroughly embraces the issues that give us hope as people connected to Ghana. Narrated with humor, the book is Nana’s eloquence at its best.

    GHS 40.00

    I Speak of Ghana

    GHS 40.00
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  • Unforgettable: Living a Life That Matters

    We all know someday we wouldn’t be here anymore. Not necessarily dying but we won’t be where we are forever. We will move on someday. We might leave our positions for someone to occupy. We might even take the final bow out of life. When that day comes, most of us wouldn’t like to go like the flicker—without a trace. We would like to leave behind something that says “we were here.” We would like to be remembered and somehow, we all would like to be missed.

    In Unforgettable, Nesta Jojoe Erskine walks you through the subtle art of leaving a trace on the grounds that you walk. Drawing on the amazing life stories and lessons of people who have been able to leave their mark, Nesta exposes the forgotten little things in life one has to do to leave a mark on the hearts of people they have dealings with.  In the end, you’ll realize that you don’t have to be Dr. Kwame Nkrumah or Mother Teresa or Martin Luther King Jr. before you can leave a mark.

    Your life, however brief it may be, if it’s lived well, you too can leave your mark and be Unforgettable.

    GHS 30.00
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    Death and Pain: Rawlings’ Ghana – The Inside Story

    “On 30 December 1981, the Ghana Armed Forces held a party at the Ministry of Defence at Burma Camp. The President, Dr. Hilla Limann, had been invited, but because of the security situation in the country he was advised not to attend. Around 3 p.m. the President changed his mind and decided to attend the party. It was not until around midnight that he returned to his official residence at the Castle.

    “Around this time, 10 soldiers, some retired, all other ranks, gathered some two miles to the south of the Camp waiting for grenades and other ammunition from their accomplices at the First Infantry Battalion at Michel Camp, about 20 miles to the East of their position. They never turned up. At about 2 a.m. on 31 December 1981, the small group decided to move. Their objective: to seize the country and form a new government.

    “Leaving the Labadi beach in the neighbourhood of the Teshie Military Range, the handful of coupmakers moved through the bush to the Recce Cookhouse. Among them were C.C. Addae, Matthew Adabuga, Gbofah, Braimah, Alidu Gyiwah, Sammy Amedeka and Allieu. Jerry Rawlings was already in Burma Camp hiding in the room of Adabuga at the Gondar Barracks…”

    Do you want a first-hand account from the murderers of the 3 judges and officer whilst they were in Nsawam Prison waiting to be executed by firing squad? Do you want to see the list of Ghanaians who went ‘missing’ during the Revolution? A relevant piece of Ghana history is in this book.

     

    GHS 54.00GHS 60.00
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  • The Trial of J.J. Rawlings: Echoes of the 31st December Revolution

    The Trial of J.J. Rawlings is a fascinating book about a most fascinating period of Ghana’s history, at the centre of which stands the fascinating personality of J.J. Rawlings. This book was a sensation when it was published thirty-two years ago. It was a bestseller in Ghana and a most sought-after book by Ghanaians everywhere as well as people who, for whatever reason, had an interest in Ghana. This is because the book unlocked (or at least tried to unlock) the enigma of Jerry John Rawlings to the extent that it was possible so to do.

    Almost a complete generation later, the book is even more relevant today than when it was first published; the story of Jerry Rawlings and the period of the AFRC and early PNDC periods remains only partially told. Indeed, the social and economic dynamics that produced June 4th have also receded into the mists of time, and with them the man at the centre of this tale. Therefore, the story this book tells has acquired a new urgency and become a national requirement.

    NANA KWASI GYAN-APENTENG
    CHAIRMAN, NATIONAL MEDIA COMMISSION

    GHS 40.00
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  • Sam: A Life of Service to God and Country

    In this memoir, Sam Okudzeto shares experiences from a life of service to Ghana, and provides unique insights from a life spent on the front lines.
    “Uncle Sam as some of us know him is iconic. He is larger than life in his profession, his faith and his service to humanity. His memoir deepens our respect for his intellect and joie de vivre and provide steps for us to emulate his rich and blessed life.” – Rev. Dr. Joyce Aryee, Executive Director, Salt & Light Ministries, Management and Communications Consultant
    “There are people you meet in life who change you. Their goodness, their kindness, their willingness to speak out for what is just and right make you look at the world in a different light. They inspire you simply by being themselves. Sam is one of those persons in my life. He is a giant in the field of law. In the fifteen years I have known him I have witnessed endless times where he has brought insight and compassion and leadership to the issues at hand. I have been in awe of Sam for these many years. Someone once said that fate chooses out relatives, we choose our friends. My friendship with Sam is cherished gift.” – Dr. Mark S. Ellis, Executive Director, International Bar Association
    “Sam’s reputation as a redoubtable and fearless advocate for the rule the law, truth and integrity has won him the respect and admiration of his peers, juniors and even his harshest critics. He is indeed a legal colossus, a true patriot with a strong moral character and an unswerving passion for pursuing the cause of right without fear of might. He is a very warm and wonderful, human being – a selfless, compassionate lover of people who seeks the good, happiness and progress of others. Above all else, Sam is a man of faith who loves the Lord with all his heart.” – Her Ladyship Georgina T. Wood, Former Chief Justice of Ghana
    GHS 100.00
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    Going to Town

    Professor Paul Archibald Vianney Ansah (1938-1993), Ex-Director of the School of Communication Studies, University of Ghana; reputed scholar, communicator, journalist, critic; a devout Christian, an uncompromising advocate of democracy, freedom and justice; generous, humorous, pedantic, but also defiant and choleric. Close associates called him “Uncle Paul”; his students made an acronym of him: PAVA. The world knows him as P.A.V. Ansah. His death on 14th June, 1993, created a big void in journalism, and dented the writer’s crusade against oppression and dictatorship in Africa.

    From 1968 when he assumed the editorial seat of The Legon Observer until his death, the name Paul Ansah became perhaps the most revered epitome of incisive journalism in Ghana. By 14th June, 1993 when he died, P.A.V. Ansah, over a quarter of a century had succeeded in perfecting a paradigm in Ghana’s journalistic tradition. Write-and-be damned was its hallmark, and Going-to-Town its colloquial shibboleth. Avid readers of Paul Ansah’s column in The Ghanaian Chronicle weekly, for which he wrote in his last years, eventually got used to the ominous prelude of his weekly sojourns to town.

    In this book, the editors put together a selection of the newspaper contributions of Paul Ansah from 1991 till his death in June 1993. The articles were mostly published in his column in the Ghanaian Chronicle, but also include his contributions in the Free Press, Independent, and the Standard.

    His writings, reflecting a broad range of themes, have been grouped under four overlapping headings: Media, Politics, Society, and International.

    GHS 54.00GHS 60.00

    Going to Town

    GHS 54.00GHS 60.00
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  • The Persistence of Paradox: Memoirs of F.L. Bartels

    Francis Bartels is a man of many, many parts. As Headmaster of one of Ghana’s great schools, he was wisely strict and strictly wise. This excellent book shows that he has stamped his personality on fields as far apart as educational policy, linguistics and diplomacy. Yet he is also a romantic, a humorist, a family man, as well as a keen analyst of his origins and ancestry.

    Perhaps there is a certain Dutch caution in his committee work and strategic statements at educational conferences. Perhaps there is also a profound desire for order and purpose, and a liking for a job well done, which pays tribute to his German forebears. It certainly paid off at his beloved school, Mfantsipim, where Kofi Annan, current UN Secretary-General, was once his pupil.

    Perhaps there is a recognizable Englishness in Francis Bartel’s affability, his dislike of tyranny, and his respect for those fraternal connections which lighten the load of educators and administrators across the world.

    There is clearly beauty and lucidity in the prose that he uses to describe the paradoxes encountered in a long life full of varied achievements. He was honoured by the United Kingdom that helped to educate him. He was welcomed across Africa and the United States of America as a speaker on education at all levels. He was appointed as a high-ranking staff member of UNESCO and as his country’s Ambassador to the Federal Republic of Germany.

    Thus, Francis Bartels is that admirable product of the twentieth century — a citizen of the world. In his fascinating story, we see him employ all the skills and qualities mentioned above to ensure his survival in various challenging environments. And this, he will agree, is firmly rooted in h is Africanness which is inspired by his abiding vision of excellence.

    GHS 100.00
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  • The Ewe People: A Study of the Ewe People in German Togo

    The Ewe of Ghana, Togo and Benin have been one of the most documented ethnic groups in West Africa, given their encounters with the German, French and British colonial administrations. In 1906, Jakob Spieth, a German Bremen Missionary, published Die Ewe-Stamme. Die Ewe-Stamme is one of the most comprehensive treatises on the history, religion, economic life, traditional social structure, and, indeed, the entire spectrum of everyday life of the Ewe. Published over 100 years ago the book had limited circulation and became increasingly rare to the extent that it almost became a deified piece of work and source of classified knowledge. Additionally, Die Ewe-Stamme was published in German and old non-standard and colloquial Ewe languages. It is hoped this translation of Die Ewe-Stamme into English and contemporary Ewe might create a revival of interest amongst researchers, enhance the understanding for the traditional Ewe culture and become reading material in schools and universities.

    GHS 150.00
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  • Kwame Nkrumah: The Great African

    Most books on Kwame Nkrumah have been written with the adult in mind. This biography, however, has been written specially for the young reader. The aim is to trace the development of this unforgettable son of Africa from childhood to adulthood — his beliefs, achievements and contribution to the liberation of Africa from colonial rule.

    We have also tried to explain his place in the history of the world. Students in schools and teacher training colleges as well as young readers would find this volume very captivating and full of insight.

    GHS 15.00
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  • Dark Days in Ghana

    The final book by Kwame Nkrumah, Ghana’s first President, this records his experiences after he was over thrown in a coup d’etat.

    GHS 50.00
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    The Art of War

    Considered the most prestigious and influential book of strategy in the world today.

    Conflict is an inevitable part of life, according to this ancient Chinese classic of strategy, but everything necessary to deal with conflict wisely, honorably, victoriously, is already present within us.

    Compiled more than two thousand years ago by a mysterious warrior-philosopher, The Art of War is still perhaps the most prestigious and influential book of strategy in the world, as eagerly studied in Asia by modern politicians and executives as it has been by military leaders since ancient times. As a study of the anatomy of organizations in conflict, The Art of War applies to competition and conflict in general, on every level from the interpersonal to the international. Its aim is invincibility, victory without battle, and unassailable strength through understanding the physics, politics, and psychology of conflict.

    GHS 45.00GHS 50.00

    The Art of War

    GHS 45.00GHS 50.00
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    Full Set of Nana Awere Damoah books

    The full set of Nana Awere Damoah's 7 books is available now, including the soon-to-launched new book Quotes by NAD. Autographed.

    Get the 7 books together for GHS 250 including free delivery across Ghana.

    Books in this set

    Excursions in My Mind
    Through the Gates of Thought
    Tales from Different Tails
    I Speak of Ghana
    Sebitically Speaking
    Nsempiisms
    Quotes by NAD

    GHS 250.00GHS 270.00
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