• The Bold New Normal: Creating The Africa Where Everyone Prospers

    Have you ever wondered what it will take to transform each African country into a prosperous nation where each citizen has a real opportunity to thrive? Africa’s narrative has been shaped by a vision of the future that remains bleak. A vision that says a little more is okay for the African. It is time to challenge and change our paradigm of what great outcomes look like for an African country.

    It is time for The Bold New Normal of an Africa where citizens of each country genuinely have the opportunity to prosper.

    The formula for sustainable prosperity has been tried and tested world over. Why then do we continue to hope that a different method, that has thus far failed the continent, will create sustainable prosperity?

    The Bold New Normal is a timely publication that coincides with the 400th anniversary of the start of slavery: the year of return. 400 years since the unraveling of African began, it is time to piece her back together and focus forward. It is surely the time for The Bold New Normal!

  • The Fourth John: Reign, Rejection & Rebound

    01

    An influential northern caucus is secretly meeting and grooming him to contest the man who will select him as a vice presidential candidate. A meeting between the first lady and the Brong-Ahafo caucus results in, perhaps, the fastest ministerial reshuffle in the history of the country. At 2a.m., before the breaking of a major scandal, there is a meeting between the president’s friend and the investigative journalist about how to involve the main opposition leader, in the story to minimise its damage to the president in the upcoming election. The wife of the president reports the wife of the vice president to the vice president’s mother. The night before a crucial election, the president and his main contender are locked up in a meeting with Ghana’s most revered traditional ruler.

    These and other revealing accounts on governance, policies and programmes of the fourth presidency of Ghana’s Fourth Republic are the intriguing contents of this book. Here, the journalist whose investigations are believed to have contributed to the downfall of the administration gets brutally intimate with the regime.

    Rare interviews with key figures of the governing party and historical contexts to contemporary events provide readers and students of African politics the inside story of what is considered the model democracy on the continent. The fluidity of the writing style and humour make this book about politics and governance in Ghana’s Fourth Republic both informative, educative and entertaining.

    The Fourth John: Reign, Rejection & Rebound

    01
    80.00100.00
  • Death and Pain: Rawlings’ Ghana – The Inside Story

    “On 30 December 1981, the Ghana Armed Forces held a party at the Ministry of Defence at Burma Camp. The President, Dr. Hilla Limann, had been invited, but because of the security situation in the country he was advised not to attend. Around 3 p.m. the President changed his mind and decided to attend the party. It was not until around midnight that he returned to his official residence at the Castle.

    “Around this time, 10 soldiers, some retired, all other ranks, gathered some two miles to the south of the Camp waiting for grenades and other ammunition from their accomplices at the First Infantry Battalion at Michel Camp, about 20 miles to the East of their position. They never turned up. At about 2 a.m. on 31 December 1981, the small group decided to move. Their objective: to seize the country and form a new government.

    “Leaving the Labadi beach in the neighbourhood of the Teshie Military Range, the handful of coupmakers moved through the bush to the Recce Cookhouse. Among them were C.C. Addae, Matthew Adabuga, Gbofah, Braimah, Alidu Gyiwah, Sammy Amedeka and Allieu. Jerry Rawlings was already in Burma Camp hiding in the room of Adabuga at the Gondar Barracks…”

    Do you want a first-hand account from the murderers of the 3 judges and officer whilst they were in Nsawam Prison waiting to be executed by firing squad? Do you want to see the list of Ghanaians who went ‘missing’ during the Revolution? A relevant piece of Ghana history is in this book.

     

  • Recipe For Light Soup

    Age Range: 6 – 10 years

    My Auntie Halima is the best cook in all of Tamale. All the women and labourers like to eat at her food bar. But guess what happens that afternoon the neighbourhood dogs start barking loud? Join Auntie Halima, Brother James, Mama Abena and Foreman Out and his men in this enjoyable tale about Tamale’s best food bar.

  • I Speak of Ghana

    It’s a rare person who can be both funny and wise at the same time. Yet that is exactly the way to describe Nana Awere Damoah’s writings in this small but compelling short story collection about contemporary life in Ghana. In it the reader will find Ghanaman in traffic, or Ghanawoman paying the corrupt policeman. Either way, one knows these are the words of a master story teller who handily blurs the lines between laughing so hard it makes one cry, or crying so hard it makes one laugh.

    I Speak of Ghana is an honest journey of deft oration replete with the sounds (from the harmonious to the cacophonic), smells (including the pleasant and unpleasant), sights (from the eye-catching to the embarrassing), frustrations, triumphs and the mundane – everything that makes the Ghanaian experience finds its way into this book. Unlike the typical ranting about Ghanaian situations, Nana performs an insightful examination of the heart of the matter. Dissimilar to empty praise, Nana thoroughly embraces the issues that give us hope as people connected to Ghana. Narrated with humor, the book is Nana’s eloquence at its best.

  • Grandma Goody’s Story: From Gold Coast to Ghana

    Introduce your children to the Ghana story again in this beautifully-narrated tale with pictures, published to celebrate Ghana’s 60th independence anniversary. Allow yourself and your children to travel through time…

    Grandma Goody’s Story: From Gold Coast to Ghana. A book in which Grandma Goody makes Ghana’s history alive to children with witty stories of her experiences and many captivating photos.

  • The Daring Duo 1: 179 Jabulani Street

    Age Range: 8+ years

    It all started with a pink jacket, a key and a scribbled note…

    When Jama and Ufulu bump into each other near a suspicious-looking house in Yeoville, they don’t realize that this will be the beginning of a friendship full of adventures.

    A new team is born…and they are ready to find out what is really going on at the mysterious 179 Jabulani Street!

    Join the Daring Duo…in their thrilling first adventure!

  • Courtesy for Boys and Girls

    01

    Age Range: 9 years and above

    Most of us were trained with this as a guidebook. Fundamental rules of courtesy for young people, rules on behaviour; much more needed today!

    This book is adapted from up-to-date fundamental rules of courtesy as they apply to young people of today and list for the guidance of parents and teachers 165 rules on a gracious refinement of behaviour.

    Courtesy for Boys and Girls

    01
    15.00
  • Ekuba and Spidey: The Honey Tree (Volume 1)

    Ekuba loves picking fruits to share with her friends. Her new friend Spidey needs to learn lessons in sharing and saying Thank You. Spidey wanted to trick Ekuba but she caught on and he ended up in a tree.
  • A Monster at Midnight

    Age Range: 8+ years

    Phila is not happy that has to spend her holidays in her grandma’s village. It’s too far from her best friends and she is trapped with her annoying brother and sister.

    When she hears the story of Bro. E, a strange tale the young children of the village tell to scare and taunt, she has no idea about the thrilling adventure ahead.

    A monster is coming at midnight, RUN, PHILA, RUN!

     

  • Bookset: African Folktale Series (10 books)

    Age Range: 7 – 12 years

    In these beautifully illustrated, collectable library of easy-to-read traditional folktales with their moral lessons, test questions, and activities for the young ones, classic African stories are brought magically to reality. The stories in the African Folktale Series (AFS) are filled with moral lessons that have been handed down from many generations to the present in many African countries from Ghana, Nigeria, Cameroons, Liberia, the Gambia, Kenya, Ethiopia, Tanzania to Zimbabwe. The traditional African elders who inhabited an ancient continent brimming with wisdom successfully utilized these folktales to socialize their youngsters to the moral requirements of their society to insure order, security and growth.

    The titles in this set are:

    1. The Evil King Who Destroyed Himself (A Nigerian Folktale)
    2. Ananse And Friends at the Village of Plenty and Another Tale from Africa
    3. The Boy Who Cut Off the Elephant’s Tail (A Ghanaian Folktale)
    4. Ananse Finally Meets His Match and Another Tale from Africa
    5. God’s Challenge to Wise People (A Ghanaian Folktale)
    6. Ananse Challenges the Powerful King (A Ghanaian Folktale)
    7. Animals in the Midst of Famine (A Nigerian Folktale)
    8. The Price of Jealousy – Version One (A Nigerian Folktale)
    9. The Fate of the Deceitful Tortoise
    10. The Princess Who Married the Evil Spirit
  • The Herd Boy

    Malusi is a herd boy who tends to his grandfather’s sheep and goats among the mountains of the Transkei. High above, eagles fly while on the ground below, beetles crawl, termites scurry and dust flies as Malusi plays games of stick-fighting with his friend. But there’s danger too…

    Can Malusi save his lambs from the hungry baboon who’s stalking the flock?

    And who is the old man in the shiny car who stops to chat, and encourages the herd boy in his dream of being President?

    This beautiful picture book is about a boy who dares to dream of a big future. It is a story of empowerment, self-belief and leadership, and is inspired by the life of former president Nelson Mandela.

    The Herd Boy

    30.00

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