• A Giant Tree Has Fallen – Tributes to Ali Mazrui (Pre-order)

    **Available mid February 2019**

    This book memorializing the life and work of Ali Al’amin Mazrui comprises more than 130 tributes written by people ranging from heads of state to journalists.Out of respect for Mazrui’s immediate family members, their tributes are presented first, followed by those from his global family members.

    Included in the book are three chapters that comprise an introductory essay, a brief biography of Mazrui, and an essay on metaphorical-linguistic analysis of the tributes. The book also has a preface by the co-editors and a foreword by Salim Ahmed Salim, the former prime Minister of the United Republic of Tanzania and former Secretary-General of the Organization of African Unity (OAU), now known as the African Union. Dr Salim, who served as the Secretary- General of the OAU from 1989 to 2001, was Mazrui’s friend and contemporary. Mazrui once described Salim as ‘Mr. Africa’ and the ‘first real post-colonial Secretary-General of the OAU.’

     

    130.00
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  • Bogus Informants…Nation Wreckers

    Bogus informants move round mongering to security persons, alarming information that has absolutely no merit. Our security persons, a good number of times, fall for this mischief and draw all sorts of faulty conclusions. These bogus informants sometimes make a living from such evil lies or simply use them to score cheap and very unfair points at their rivals or competitors.

    It is just like the days of the Young Pioneers when a spoilt child, who does not want to be disciplined, would simply go and whisper some outright lies against the parents and, voila, such an unfortunate parent gets trapped on the wrong side of Osagyefo.

    Truth be told, this act of deliberate misinformation is an act of terrorism not new to our socio-political setting. Kofi Bentum Quantson, a security intelligence expert who worked hard through the ranks to become Director of the Bureau of National Investigations (BNI), examines this threat to nation building in this popular book.

    40.00
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  • Death and Pain: Rawlings’ Ghana – The Inside Story

    “On 30 December 1981, the Ghana Armed Forces held a party at the Ministry of Defence at Burma Camp. The President, Dr. Hilla Limann, had been invited, but because of the security situation in the country he was advised not to attend. Around 3 p.m. the President changed his mind and decided to attend the party. It was not until around midnight that he returned to his official residence at the Castle.

    “Around this time, 10 soldiers, some retired, all other ranks, gathered some two miles to the south of the Camp waiting for grenades and other ammunition from their accomplices at the First Infantry Battalion at Michel Camp, about 20 miles to the East of their position. They never turned up. At about 2 a.m. on 31 December 1981, the small group decided to move. Their objective: to seize the country and form a new government.

    “Leaving the Labadi beach in the neighbourhood of the Teshie Military Range, the handful of coupmakers moved through the bush to the Recce Cookhouse. Among them were C.C. Addae, Matthew Adabuga, Gbofah, Braimah, Alidu Gyiwah, Sammy Amedeka and Allieu. Jerry Rawlings was already in Burma Camp hiding in the room of Adabuga at the Gondar Barracks…”

    Do you want a first-hand account from the murderers of the 3 judges and officer whilst they were in Nsawam Prison waiting to be executed by firing squad? Do you want to see the list of Ghanaians who went ‘missing’ during the Revolution? A relevant piece of Ghana history is in this book.

     

    60.00
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    Digital Democracy, Analogue Politics: How the Internet Era is Transforming Kenya

    From the upheavals of recent national elections to the success of the #MyDressMyChoice feminist movement, digital platforms have already had a dramatic impact on political life in Kenya – one of the most electronically advanced countries in Africa. While the impact of the Digital Age on Western politics has been extensively debated, there is still little appreciation of how it has been felt in developing countries such as Kenya, where Twitter, Facebook, WhatsApp and other online platforms are increasingly a part of everyday life.

    Written by a respected Kenyan activist and researcher at the forefront of political online struggles, this book presents a unique contribution to the debate on digital democracy. For traditionally marginalised groups, particularly women and people with disabilities, digital spaces have allowed Kenyans to build new communities which transcend old ethnic and gender divisions. But the picture is far from wholly positive.

    Digital Democracy, Analogue Politics explores the drastic efforts being made by elites to contain online activism, as well as how ‘fake news’, a failed digital vote-counting system and the incumbent president’s recruitment of Cambridge Analytica contributed to tensions around the 2017 elections. Reframing digital democracy from the African perspective, Nyabola’s ground-breaking work opens up new ways of understanding our current global online era.

    150.00
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  • Dreams From My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance

    Before Barack Obama became a politician, he was, among other things, a writer. Dreams from My Father is a masterpiece: a refreshing, revealing portrait of a young man asking the big questions about identity and belonging.

    The son of a black African father and a white American mother, President Obama recounts an emotional odyssey, retracing the migration of his mother’s family from Kansas to Hawaii, then to his childhood home in Indonesia. Finally he travels to Kenya, where he confronts the bitter truth of his father’s life and at last reconciles his divided inheritance.

    Written at the age of thirty-three, Dreams from My Father is an unforgettable read. It illuminates not only Obama’s journey, but also our universal desire to understand our history, and what makes us the people we are.

    50.00
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  • Going to Town

    Professor Paul Archibald Vianney Ansah (1938-1993), Ex-Director of the School of Communication Studies, University of Ghana; reputed scholar, communicator, journalist, critic; a devout Christian, an uncompromising advocate of democracy, freedom and justice; generous, humorous, pedantic, but also defiant and choleric. Close associates called him “Uncle Paul”; his students made an acronym of him: PAVA. The world knows him as P.A.V. Ansah. His death on 14th June, 1993, created a big void in journalism, and dented the writer’s crusade against oppression and dictatorship in Africa.

    From 1968 when he assumed the editorial seat of The Legon Observer until his death, the name Paul Ansah became perhaps the most revered epitome of incisive journalism in Ghana. By 14th June, 1993 when he died, P.A.V. Ansah, over a quarter of a century had succeeded in perfecting a paradigm in Ghana’s journalistic tradition. Write-and-be damned was its hallmark, and Going-to-Town its colloquial shibboleth. Avid readers of Paul Ansah’s column in The Ghanaian Chronicle weekly, for which he wrote in his last years, eventually got used to the ominous prelude of his weekly sojourns to town.

    In this book, the editors put together a selection of the newspaper contributions of Paul Ansah from 1991 till his death in June 1993. The articles were mostly published in his column in the Ghanaian Chronicle, but also include his contributions in the Free Press, Independent, and the Standard.

    His writings, reflecting a broad range of themes, have been grouped under four overlapping headings: Media, Politics, Society, and International.

    60.00

    Going to Town

    60.00
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  • I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and was Shot by the Taliban

    Winner of the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize

    When the Taliban took control of the Swat Valley, one girl fought for her right to an education. On Tuesday, 9 October 2012, she almost paid the ultimate price when she was shot in the head at point-blank range.

    Malala Yousafzai’s extraordinary journey has taken her from a remote valley in northern Pakistan to the halls of the United Nations. She has become a global symbol of peaceful protest and is the youngest ever winner of the Nobel Peace Prize.

    I Am Malala will make you believe in the power of one person’s voice to inspire change in the world.

    *****

    ‘Malala is an inspiration to girls and women all over the world.’ JK Rowling
    ‘Moving and illuminating.’ Observer
    ‘Inspirational and powerful.’ Grazia
    ‘Her story is astonishing.’ Spectator

    50.00
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  • I Spoke for Freedom: History and Politics of the Ghana Press

    I Spoke for Freedom: History and Politics of the Ghana Press is a rich tapestry of perspectives on media practice and democracy; government- press relations; press freedom, ethics and responsibility; the role of media regulatory bodies and media associations; media and society; public relations; the law and press, governance issues for the private and public media and many related issues that have defined the evolution and development of the Ghana media.

    50.00
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  • Interim Republic: Ghana – The 1st Military Junta (1966 – 1969)

    When the long years of plotting by foreign powers with Ghanaian collaborators to upset governance in Ghana finally succeeded, many justification books and laudatory pamphlets and newspaper articles were published at home and abroad. Some bore pseudonames, others came forceful. The event which occasioned the potpourri was the 1st military coup d’etat in Ghana staged by a military and police combine.

    The Military/Police combination which overtook the government of Ghana, the 1st Republic Convention People’s Party (CPP)-led government in that putsch, installed an administration which came to be known as the National Liberation Council (NLC).

    This book sheds much-needed light on their lives and times.

    45.00
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  • Martin Luther King, Jr., on Leadership: Inspiration and Wisdom for Challenging Times

    What does it mean to be a leader? How does an individual create an unstoppable organization, reshape a struggle, a competition, or even a society? Why do we listen to one man’s voice, and ignore another’s? In the history of leadership in America, no one has galvanized a time, place, and people more forcefully than Martin Luther King, Jr. This book is an insightful examination of the leadership style of Dr. King, and using examples from his vision, offers powerful lessons that can be applied to one’s life, business, or endeavor.

    60.00
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  • Ogyakrom: The Missing Pages of June 4th (Fireman Series) – Hardback

    Kwesi Yankah is currently the Minister of State for Tertiary Education in Ghana. Until April 2017, he was Vice Chancellor of Central University, Ghana, and was previously Professor of Linguistics and Pro-Vice Chancellor at the University of Ghana. Yankah, an inimitable satirist, is a proud product of Winneba Secondary School, University of Ghana and Indiana University, USA, where he did his doctorate. Well known in literary and academic circles, Professor Yankah has been a Public Intellectual since the late 1970s when, at 27, he started an anonymous column in The Catholic Standard newspaper, under the pseudonym Abonsam Fireman. The credit for the column, in a suppressive political environment, was often mistakenly given to the two great luminaries PAV Ansah and Adu Boahen.

    Later in 1986, when Yankah returned from doctoral work at Indiana University, he introduced another weekly column, Woes of the Kwatriot, this time in The Mirror which he sustained for a period of ten years. In 1996, the Ghana Journalists Association honoured him for ‘the longest running column in the history of Ghanaian journalism.’ His writings, both literary and academic, have won for Yankah various awards including the WEB Du Bois Award (GAW), the Zora Hurston Award (GAW), the Ghana Book Development Award (GBDC) and the Gold Book Award given by the Ghana Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    The present volume represents landmarks within 22 months of Yankah’s weekly column in The Catholic Standard, from January 1979 to March 1980. It is inspired by topical issues in two military regimes (General F Akuffo’s SMC 2, Rawlings’ June 4th Revolution) and one civilian government (Hilla Limann’s PNP). This compilation altogether allows a veiled peep into the most turbulent period in Ghana’s political history, Rawlings’ June 4th Revolution, including preceding events and the aftermath of the Revolution. In the words of Dr Anthony Bonnah Koomson, Editor of The Catholic Standard at the time of Yankah’s celebrated column: “The book captures a momentous era in Ghana’s immediate political history, reminiscences of which the author has sough to recreate and preserve with phenomenal linguistic skill. It presents, through satire, an accurate heartbeat of a people under intense political paralysis.”

    This book makes compelling, even if hilarious, reading on Ghana’s enigmatic June 4th Revolution.

    100.00
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  • Ogyakrom: The Missing Pages of June 4th (Fireman Series) – Paperback

    Kwesi Yankah is currently the Minister of State for Tertiary Education in Ghana. Until April 2017, he was Vice Chancellor of Central University, Ghana, and was previously Professor of Linguistics and Pro-Vice Chancellor at the University of Ghana. Yankah, an inimitable satirist, is a proud product of Winneba Secondary School, University of Ghana and Indiana University, USA, where he did his doctorate. Well known in literary and academic circles, Professor Yankah has been a Public Intellectual since the late 1970s when, at 27, he started an anonymous column in The Catholic Standard newspaper, under the pseudonym Abonsam Fireman. The credit for the column, in a suppressive political environment, was often mistakenly given to the two great luminaries PAV Ansah and Adu Boahen.

    Later in 1986, when Yankah returned from doctoral work at Indiana University, he introduced another weekly column, Woes of the Kwatriot, this time in The Mirror which he sustained for a period of ten years. In 1996, the Ghana Journalists Association honoured him for ‘the longest running column in the history of Ghanaian journalism.’ His writings, both literary and academic, have won for Yankah various awards including the WEB Du Bois Award (GAW), the Zora Hurston Award (GAW), the Ghana Book Development Award (GBDC) and the Gold Book Award given by the Ghana Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    The present volume represents landmarks within 22 months of Yankah’s weekly column in The Catholic Standard, from January 1979 to March 1980. It is inspired by topical issues in two military regimes (General F Akuffo’s SMC 2, Rawlings’ June 4th Revolution) and one civilian government (Hilla Limann’s PNP). This compilation altogether allows a veiled peep into the most turbulent period in Ghana’s political history, Rawlings’ June 4th Revolution, including preceding events and the aftermath of the Revolution. In the words of Dr Anthony Bonnah Koomson, Editor of The Catholic Standard at the time of Yankah’s celebrated column: “The book captures a momentous era in Ghana’s immediate political history, reminiscences of which the author has sough to recreate and preserve with phenomenal linguistic skill. It presents, through satire, an accurate heartbeat of a people under intense political paralysis.”

    This book makes compelling, even if hilarious, reading on Ghana’s enigmatic June 4th Revolution.

    90.00
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