• A Giant Tree Has Fallen – Tributes to Ali Mazrui (Pre-order)

    **Available mid February 2019**

    This book memorializing the life and work of Ali Al’amin Mazrui comprises more than 130 tributes written by people ranging from heads of state to journalists.Out of respect for Mazrui’s immediate family members, their tributes are presented first, followed by those from his global family members.

    Included in the book are three chapters that comprise an introductory essay, a brief biography of Mazrui, and an essay on metaphorical-linguistic analysis of the tributes. The book also has a preface by the co-editors and a foreword by Salim Ahmed Salim, the former prime Minister of the United Republic of Tanzania and former Secretary-General of the Organization of African Unity (OAU), now known as the African Union. Dr Salim, who served as the Secretary- General of the OAU from 1989 to 2001, was Mazrui’s friend and contemporary. Mazrui once described Salim as ‘Mr. Africa’ and the ‘first real post-colonial Secretary-General of the OAU.’

     

  • Africa Must Unite!

    Africa Must Unite best describes what Osagyefo Kwame Nkrumah stood for.

    The mission he began over half a century ago remains uncompleted and the task of this generation is to make the dream of African unity come alive and realise our full potential as the African nation that would be embracing all peoples of African ancestry.

    Nkrumah called for the political and economic unification of African states as the most effective way to achieve economic and socio-cultural emancipation and regain full sovereignty over our land and resources.

    The thesis of Africa Unite remains unassilable, giving hope to about 1.5 billion Africans all over the world who aspire for a better life in a more humane world.

    Africa Must Unite!

  • Axioms of Kwame Nkrumah

    Containing short extracts from the writings and speeches of the foremost exponent of African liberation, unity and socialism. Part of the basic equipment of every African freedom fighter, and essential reading for all interested in the principles underlying the African Revolution.

  • Bogus Informants…Nation Wreckers

    Bogus informants move round mongering to security persons, alarming information that has absolutely no merit. Our security persons, a good number of times, fall for this mischief and draw all sorts of faulty conclusions. These bogus informants sometimes make a living from such evil lies or simply use them to score cheap and very unfair points at their rivals or competitors.

    It is just like the days of the Young Pioneers when a spoilt child, who does not want to be disciplined, would simply go and whisper some outright lies against the parents and, voila, such an unfortunate parent gets trapped on the wrong side of Osagyefo.

    Truth be told, this act of deliberate misinformation is an act of terrorism not new to our socio-political setting. Kofi Bentum Quantson, a security intelligence expert who worked hard through the ranks to become Director of the Bureau of National Investigations (BNI), examines this threat to nation building in this popular book.

  • Challenge of the Congo: A Case Study of Foreign Pressures in an Independent State

    With Author’s Note written in Conakry. An account of a crucial period in the history of the Republic of Congo by one of the heads of state most closely involved. New light is thrown on Katanga’s secession, the failure of the UN operation, the murder of Lumumba, foreign military intervention at Stanleyville (Kisangani) and the seizure of power by Mobutu. A most valuable and unusual feature is the publication of contemporary diplomatic records on which future historical analysis will be based.

     

  • Class Struggle In Africa

    Recent African history has exposed the close links between the interests of imperialism and neo-colonialism and the African bourgeoisie. This book reveals the nature and extent of the class struggle in Africa, and sets it in the broad context of the African Revolution and the world socialist revolution.

     

  • Consciencism: Philosophy and Ideology for Decolonisation

    Revised, and with a new Author’s Note written in Conakry

    Kwame Nkrumah, always in the vanguard of the African Revolution, has not only been at the centre of its political action, but has formulated its ideology. In this book he expresses his philosophical beliefs, relating them to the special problems of Africa, and states his case for scientific socialism as the essential and logical development from Africa’s socio-political heritage.

     

     

  • Death and Pain: Rawlings’ Ghana – The Inside Story

    “On 30 December 1981, the Ghana Armed Forces held a party at the Ministry of Defence at Burma Camp. The President, Dr. Hilla Limann, had been invited, but because of the security situation in the country he was advised not to attend. Around 3 p.m. the President changed his mind and decided to attend the party. It was not until around midnight that he returned to his official residence at the Castle.

    “Around this time, 10 soldiers, some retired, all other ranks, gathered some two miles to the south of the Camp waiting for grenades and other ammunition from their accomplices at the First Infantry Battalion at Michel Camp, about 20 miles to the East of their position. They never turned up. At about 2 a.m. on 31 December 1981, the small group decided to move. Their objective: to seize the country and form a new government.

    “Leaving the Labadi beach in the neighbourhood of the Teshie Military Range, the handful of coupmakers moved through the bush to the Recce Cookhouse. Among them were C.C. Addae, Matthew Adabuga, Gbofah, Braimah, Alidu Gyiwah, Sammy Amedeka and Allieu. Jerry Rawlings was already in Burma Camp hiding in the room of Adabuga at the Gondar Barracks…”

    Do you want a first-hand account from the murderers of the 3 judges and officer whilst they were in Nsawam Prison waiting to be executed by firing squad? Do you want to see the list of Ghanaians who went ‘missing’ during the Revolution? A relevant piece of Ghana history is in this book.

     

  • Death of an Empire: Kwame Nkrumah in Ghana and Africa

    A participant-witness in the history of the transition from Gold Coast to Ghana, Jantuah who died in 2011 at the age of 89, reflects and interprets with unique understanding some of the major events of the 1950s and 60s as well as foreign policy formulation including his role as a diplomat during the Algerian struggle for Independence and France’s Charles de Gaulle’s retrogressive policies; his dealings with the African National Congress and it’s president, Oliver Tambo, an Apartheid and Southern Rhodesia; becoming at the end an executor to his friend – Nkrumah’s Will.

    The book also has reflections on Ghana’s Fourth Republic and development on the African Continent since. It is edited with a detailed introduction by Jantuah’s nephew, the development specialist and literacy writer, Ivor Agyeman-Duah, who he worked with over the years on this and is currently a Visiting Associate Professor at the University of Johannesburg in South Africa.

  • Digital Democracy, Analogue Politics: How the Internet Era is Transforming Kenya

    From the upheavals of recent national elections to the success of the #MyDressMyChoice feminist movement, digital platforms have already had a dramatic impact on political life in Kenya – one of the most electronically advanced countries in Africa. While the impact of the Digital Age on Western politics has been extensively debated, there is still little appreciation of how it has been felt in developing countries such as Kenya, where Twitter, Facebook, WhatsApp and other online platforms are increasingly a part of everyday life.

    Written by a respected Kenyan activist and researcher at the forefront of political online struggles, this book presents a unique contribution to the debate on digital democracy. For traditionally marginalised groups, particularly women and people with disabilities, digital spaces have allowed Kenyans to build new communities which transcend old ethnic and gender divisions. But the picture is far from wholly positive.

    Digital Democracy, Analogue Politics explores the drastic efforts being made by elites to contain online activism, as well as how ‘fake news’, a failed digital vote-counting system and the incumbent president’s recruitment of Cambridge Analytica contributed to tensions around the 2017 elections. Reframing digital democracy from the African perspective, Nyabola’s ground-breaking work opens up new ways of understanding our current global online era.

  • Dreams From My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance

    Before Barack Obama became a politician, he was, among other things, a writer. Dreams from My Father is a masterpiece: a refreshing, revealing portrait of a young man asking the big questions about identity and belonging.

    The son of a black African father and a white American mother, President Obama recounts an emotional odyssey, retracing the migration of his mother’s family from Kansas to Hawaii, then to his childhood home in Indonesia. Finally he travels to Kenya, where he confronts the bitter truth of his father’s life and at last reconciles his divided inheritance.

    Written at the age of thirty-three, Dreams from My Father is an unforgettable read. It illuminates not only Obama’s journey, but also our universal desire to understand our history, and what makes us the people we are.

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