• Solma – Tales from Northern Ghana

    This compilation of stories is specially written for children of all ages. This collection is culled from tales told among the Gurunsi people of Northern Ghana. They make interesting reading and teach children the needed moral and social values.

    “… Mothers, go and tell your children that Kanwum lost her heart because she would not listen to her mother. Tell your children what happened to Kanwum and why it happened. Let your children’s children not forget this story. Children, go home and listen to your mothers and your fathers. Let this story be told as long as there are children.”

    10.00
  • The Lost Royal Treasure

    “As soon as the children entered the cave, several pairs of rough hands grabbed them and bound them. Yaa was too scared to talk, she fainted.”

    When Koku and Kakra eagerly agree to accompany Prof Kumah and his daughter Yaa Asantewaa on an archeological expedition, they are unaware of the dangers that lie ahead of them. Whatever will the children do when they are lured into the mountain containing the lost royal treasure of Bepowase and are trapped by Boss, the evil head of a galamsey syndicate?

    20.00
  • The Mystery of the Haunted House

    This book was awarded a Burt Award for African Literature, Ghana 2010. The Burt Award for African Literature is a new literary prize that the recognizes excellence in young adult fiction from Africa.

    “He continued reading about the different methods of grafting, about how to cut and store and protect scions and what the best time for planting was. The light from the torch began to grow dim. Koku checked the time. It was almost midnight, he had been reading for almost two hours. He had to sleep now or he would never wake up on time in the morning for his lessons. He switched off his torch and turned unto his side still excited. He was dozing off when he heard a sound and sat up. He couldn’t exactly say what it was but heard it. He got out of bed and tiptoed down to the hall. A light glowed dimly from the family room. Was it TV? His parents forbade them from watching late night movies but occasionally he and Sena disobeyed them and sneaked downstairs anyway. But if it was TV how come there was no sound? He stuck his head round the wall. Sena was behind the computer, her fingers pecking at the keyboard quickly. What was she doing? And who was she chatting with?”

    20.00
  • A Gift for Fafa

    Fafa has received the perfect gift for her birthday – a book on butterflies and she is extremely excited. But what happens when her baby sister rips the book up?

    12.00

    A Gift for Fafa

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  • When the Shackles Fall

    Koku and his friends, Kakra and Panyin, spend a few days with his aunt in Keta and become involved in another dangerous adventure. On a deserted island, they ran into Tutsi, a brave young girl who has run away from her village, to escape an arranged marriage to the priest of a trokosi shrine. Join Koku and his friends as they rescue his aunt and sisters from the poachers and find a way to keep Tutsi from a life of servitude.

    30.00
  • Those Who Wait

    Patience Acolatse is not amused when she learns that her ex-cousin, Rowena Quarshie, whom she hasn’t spoken to in six years is going to move in with her family, share her room and attend her school. However, Patience has a big heart and she is prepared to befriend Rowena once again and pick up their frienship from where they left off. What she isn’t prepared for is for her entire life to be turned upside down and inside out when Rowena gangs up with a group of girls and makes her life miserable. What does Patience do when she runs out of patience?

    25.00

    Those Who Wait

    25.00
  • Plain Yellow

    Amerley is not your average teenager–well, she does love books and fashion and her boyfriend, Nikoi, but that is where the similarity ends. She’s become a mother and a father to her three younger sisters, not that she minds because family means everything to Amerley. When financial constraints make her relocate to a plush neighbourhood in East Legon, she puts her own dreams aside in order to be a maid to make her family’s life better. But how far should her self-sacrifice go? Doesn’t her own life matter? Will she always put her family first even when it puts her own life at risk?

    30.00

    Plain Yellow

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  • Perfectly Imperfect

    Yayra Amenyo’s life is no longer perfect and these are the reasons why:

     

    1. She killed her father

    2. Her mother acts like everything is normal when it isn’t

    3. Her boyfriend is on ‘a break’ with her

    4. She looks like a freak

    5. She’s moved to a town far from anyone she knows

    6. She has to repeat Form Two in SHS.

     

    Could her life get any worse? Will she ever get her life to be as perfect as it once was?

    30.00
  • Out Of Stock

    Harmattan Rain

    Harmattan Rain follows three generations of women as they cope with family, love and life. A few years before Ghana’s independence, Lizzie-Achiaa’s lover disappears. Intent on finding him, she runs away from home. Akua Afriyie, Lizzie-Achiaa’s first daughter, strikes out on her own as a single parent in a country rocked by successive coups. Her daughter, Sugri grows up overprotected. She leaves home for university in New York, where she learns that sometimes one can have too much freedom. In the end, the secrets parents keep from their children eventually catch up with them.

    Harmattan Rain was shortlisted for the 2010 Commonwealth Writers’ Prize, Africa Region.

    40.00

    Harmattan Rain

    40.00
  • Out Of Stock

    Homegoing

    THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER
    Selected for Granta’s Best of Young American Novelists 2017
    Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Best First Book
    Shortlisted for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction

    Effia and Esi: two sisters with two very different destinies. One sold into slavery; one a slave trader’s wife. The consequences of their fate reverberate through the generations that follow. Taking us from the Gold Coast of Africa to the cotton-picking plantations of Mississippi; from the missionary schools of Ghana to the dive bars of Harlem, spanning three continents and seven generations, Yaa Gyasi has written a miraculous novel – the intimate, gripping story of a brilliantly vivid cast of characters and through their lives the very story of America itself.

    Epic in its canvas and intimate in its portraits, Homegoing is a searing and profound debut from a masterly new writer.

    60.00

    Homegoing

    60.00
  • Out Of Stock

    Ghana Must Go

    A stunning novel, spanning generations and continents, Ghana Must Go by rising star Taiye Selasi is a tale of family drama and forgiveness, for fans of Zadie Smith and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

    This is the story of a family — of the simple, devastating ways in which families tear themselves apart, and of the incredible lengths to which a family will go to put itself back together.

    It is the story of one family, the Sais, whose good life crumbles in an evening; a Ghanaian father, Kweku Sai, who becomes a highly respected surgeon in the US only to be disillusioned by a grotesque injustice; his Nigerian wife, Fola, the beautiful homemaker abandoned in his wake; their eldest son, Olu, determined to reconstruct the life his father should have had; their twins, seductive Taiwo and acclaimed artist Kehinde, both brilliant but scarred and flailing; their youngest, Sadie, jealously in love with her celebrity best friend. All of them sent reeling on their disparate paths into the world. Until, one day, tragedy spins the Sais in a new direction.

    This is the story of a family: torn apart by lies, reunited by grief. A family absolved, ultimately, by that bitter but most tenuous bond: familial love.

    Ghana Must Go interweaves the stories of the Sais in a rich and moving drama of separation and reunion, spanning generations and cultures from West Africa to New England, London, New York and back again. It is a debut novel of blazing originality and startling power by a writer of extraordinary gifts.

    ‘Ghana Must Go is both a fast moving story of one family’s fortunes and an ecstatic exploration of the inner lives of its members. With her perfectly-pitched prose and flawless technique, Selasi does more than merely renew our sense of the African novel: she renews our sense of the novel, period. An astonishing debut’ Teju Cole, author of Open City

    65.00

    Ghana Must Go

    65.00
  • The Twelfth Heart

    When Mercy came to her new school near Accra, she knew exactly the sort of friends she wanted to make: certainly no-one who reminded her of the small town she had left behind – poor, ugly and dull. She did not realise that true friendship comes from the heart, and that the least likely of the twelve girls in her dormitory would come to mean the most to them all.

    Anyone who has been to a boarding school will identify with the characters in the story until its poignant end.

    25.00

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