• Writing

    Writing (33)

  • Dictionary of the Hausa People: Volume 2 – English-Hausa (Cambridge Library Collection)

    Hausa is an African language originating in Niger and northern Nigeria and spoken widely in West and Central Africa as a lingua franca. Charles Henry Robinson (1861-1925) was the first student of the short-lived Hausa Association, formed in 1891 to promote the study of the Hausa Language and people. The Association sponsored Robinson to stay in Northern Nigeria from 1894 to 1895 to gain more experience in the language. On his return Robinson published an anthology of Hausa text in 1896 and a Hausa grammar in 1897 as well as his two-volume dictionary in 1899. His efforts contributed greatly to Western knowledge of the language despite criticisms of his relatively short experience of Hausa-speaking communities.

    Volume 2 is an English-Hausa dictionary, intended for those who wished to speak colloquial Hausa. The version reissued here is the 1925 fourth edition.

  • Millionaire Writer

    Takes us on a journey many have silently wished to gain guidance on.
    Kobby Kyei
    Blogger & Philanthropist

     

    A notch into the world of rediscovery where creativity meets monetary value.
    Ameyaw Debrah
    Ghanaian Entertainment & Lifestyle Blogger

     

    Revelations are twined with actions.
    Caleb Kudah
    Broadcast Journalist

     

    Provides valuable insights toward growth.
    Cwesi Oteng
    International Gospel Musician & Songwriter

     

    Treasure trove of wisdom and inspiration for those who are passionate about writing.
    Prince Akpah
    Founder- Avance Media

     

    Argues that all writers can benefit from the business side of their craft.
    Esther Wepia Kopiah
    Writer & Content Creator

  • Contemporary Issues in Ageing in Ghana: A Multidisciplinary Approach

    The rise in population of the aged (also known as elderly, older persons, old adults, senior citizens) across the universe has become a global concern given the associated demographic, social and economic implications for the well-being of the aged. This increase has implications for future generations as well as the social and economic development of the country.

    This book, being the first from the Centre for Ageing Studies at the University of Ghana advocates for the study of ageing in many facets from health, science, and socioeconomic perspectives.

    It is our hope that the book provokes dialogue and serves as the beginning of many more avenues for academic discourse to embrace diverse views and science as the way forward. At the very least, this should motivate others to focus on ageing issues than ever before.

    Given the numerous challenges associated with ageing and the neglect of the welfare of the aged in Ghana, it is imperative that we pay attention to the plight of the elderly in our African societies. There is an argument to extend ageing issues to the larger population. It is hoped that Ghana would once again be the beacon of hope for research in ageing in sub–Saharan Africa with the Centre for Ageing Studies at the University of Ghana leading the way.

  • Investigative Journalism in Africa: A Practical Manual

    “Few African investigative journalists I know are as invested in principled investigative journalism as Manasseh Azure Awuni. That trait has always come through in his exhaustive, impactful stories (some of which have featured in GIJN’s monthly and annual picks of top investigative stories from Africa). It is also abundantly evident in his new book, Investigative Journalism in Africa: A Practical Manual. In his own distinct, matter-of-fact style, Manasseh crafts a book that borrows from his own experiences to map a path for journalists who want to follow in his footsteps or learn from his unique experiences. By doing so, Manasseh has laid a crucial brick towards building African literature on investigative journalism on the continent. Most of the watchdog journalism study materials available in Africa come from the West. Manasseh’s effort is a commendable and timely step in the right direction, which I hope other investigative journalists across Africa can aspire to emulate.” − Benon Herbert Oluka, Africa Editor of Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN)

    “Manasseh Azure Awuni makes investigative journalism so practical in this manual. He dissects the thorny and hidden issues that you would not get in your average classroom. This book crafts the very basis of my intellectual thinking of what investigative journalism should be about. It is a must- read for every student who wants to achieve greater heights in investigative journalism across the world.” − Anas Aremeyaw Anas, Award-winning Ghanaian investigative journalist

    “This book is rich with practical and theoretical knowledge from one of the foremost investigative journalists in Africa. An invaluable resource for both professionals and students.” − Prof. Audrey Gadzekpo, former Dean of the School of Information and Communication Studies, University of Ghana

    “Students with a dream to pursue public interest and accountability journalism will find exceptional value here, but practitioners will do themselves a world of great value if they also keep a copy on the reading table.” − Dapo Olorunyomi, Publisher of Premium Times, Nigeria  

  • Naa Luro Mini O Bihi (Dagbani)

    This book tells about the life history of Naa Luro, a renowned Chief of Dagbong and his four sons who also became chiefs in succession after his death.

  • Sensole Kukui (Dagbani)

    This little book contains short stories about the behaviour of some animals and birds.

  • Kagbeniwushi Be Laŋto 3 (Gonja)

    The Gonja language which is spoken by the Gonjas is quite distinct from all the languages in the Northern and Upper Regions. It is rather akin to some languages in the South, particularly, the Guang languages.

    Gonja-speaking area covers more than one third of the Northern Region. It shares boundaries with the Brong-Ahafo and Volta Region in the South, and the Dagombas, the Mamprussis and the Walas in the North.

    Gonja is a tonal language and changes in meaning are brought about by tonal differences. It is to be noted that most questions end on a falling tone.

    All persons learning Gonja will find that the Gonjas have the tendency to elide vowels and slur consonants. Final vowels are always elided before other vowels, and often before words beginning with consonants.

  • Kagbeniwushi Be Laŋto 2 (Gonja)

    The Gonja language which is spoken by the Gonjas is quite distinct from all the languages in the Northern and Upper Regions. It is rather akin to some languages in the South, particularly, the Guang languages.

    Gonja-speaking area covers more than one third of the Northern Region. It shares boundaries with the Brong-Ahafo and Volta Region in the South, and the Dagombas, the Mamprussis and the Walas in the North.

    Gonja is a tonal language and changes in meaning are brought about by tonal differences. It is to be noted that most questions end on a falling tone.

    All persons learning Gonja will find that the Gonjas have the tendency to elide vowels and slur consonants. Final vowels are always elided before other vowels, and often before words beginning with consonants.

  • Kagbeniwushi Be Laŋto 1 (Gonja)

    The Gonja language which is spoken by the Gonjas is quite distinct from all the languages in the Northern and Upper Regions. It is rather akin to some languages in the South, particularly, the Guang languages.

    Gonja-speaking area covers more than one third of the Northern Region. It shares boundaries with the Brong-Ahafo and Volta Region in the South, and the Dagombas, the Mamprussis and the Walas in the North.

    Gonja is a tonal language and changes in meaning are brought about by tonal differences. It is to be noted that most questions end on a falling tone.

    All persons learning Gonja will find that the Gonjas have the tendency to elide vowels and slur consonants. Final vowels are always elided before other vowels, and often before words beginning with consonants.

  • Bookset: Let’s Speak Gonja Pack (4 books)

    The Gonja language which is spoken by the Gonjas is quite distinct from all the languages in the Northern and Upper Regions. It is rather akin to some languages in the South, particularly, the Guang languages.

    Gonja-speaking area covers more than one third of the Northern Region. It shares boundaries with the Brong-Ahafo and Volta Region in the South, and the Dagombas, the Mamprussis and the Walas in the North.

    Gonja is a tonal language and changes in meaning are brought about by tonal differences. It is to be noted that most questions end on a falling tone.

    All persons learning Gonja will find that the Gonjas have the tendency to elide vowels and slur consonants. Final vowels are always elided before other vowels, and often before words beginning with consonants.

  • Language Guide (Gonja Version)

    The Gonja language which is spoken by the Gonjas is quite distinct from all the languages in the Northern and Upper Regions. It is rather akin to some languages in the South, particularly, the Guang languages.

    Gonja-speaking area covers more than one third of the Northern Region. It shares boundaries with the Brong-Ahafo and Volta Region in the South, and the Dagombas, the Mamprussis and the Walas in the North.

    Gonja is a tonal language and changes in meaning are brought about by tonal differences. It is to be noted that most questions end on a falling tone.

    This booklet is intended to guide people who are not yet proficient in Gonja.

    All persons learning Gonja will find that the Gonjas have the tendency to elide vowels and slur consonants. Final vowels are always elided before other vowels, and often before words beginning with consonants.

  • Correct and Incorrect English Expressions

    Incorrect English expressions are common in the English-speaking world, but those using such expressions may not be aware that they are incorrect. This book examines many examples of incorrect usage. It provides the correct expressions and uses these in sentences so the reader can be confident of correct usage. The book abounds with helpful explanations of points made.

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