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  • Business @ the Speed of Thought: Succeeding in the Digital Economy

    “If the 1980s were about quality and the 1990s were about reengineering, then the 2000s will be about velocity. About how quickly the nature of business will change…The successful companies of the next decade will be the ones that use digital tools to reinvent the way they work.” — Bill Gates

    His vision changed our world. But in this monumental work Bill Gates argues that the capabilities of computers, software, and networks are only beginning to be harnessed and that your company must start building a modern, digital nervous system now in order to compete quickly and intuitively in the new millennium.

    In Business @The Speed of Thought, Gates, one of the worlds most successful, strategically-thinking CEOs explains how to turn your hardware and software into a powerful, evolving network of information by looking at the digital systems in place at Microsoft and other leading corporations. Gates shows how your company can:

    • Convert every paper process to a digital process – and end information bottlenecks
    • Use networks to create fast-reacting virtual teams to work together among traditional departments
    • Decrease cycle time by using digital transactions with suppliers and partners to get products out before the competition
    • Knock down the walls of your company, and electronically build new business relationships and new markets
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  • Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done

    When Execution was first published in 2002, it changed the way we did our jobs. By analysing the discipline of getting things done, it helped thousands of business people to make the final leap to success. Now, Larry Bossidy and Ram Charan reframe their empowering message for a world in which the old rules have been shattered and radical change is becoming routine. For the foreseeable future:

    – Growth will be slower. But the company that executes well will have the confidence, speed and resources to move fast as new opportunities emerge.

    – Competition will be fiercer, with companies searching for any possible advantage in every area.

    – Governments will take on new roles in their national economies. And companies that execute well will be more attractive as partners and suppliers, and better prepared to adapt to new waves of regulation.

    – Risk management will become a top priority for every leader, and every company will be looking for the edge in detecting new internal and external threats.

    Forget formulating a ‘vision’, then leaving others to carry it out: Execution shows you how to link together people, strategy and operations – the three core elements of every organisation – and create a business based on dialogue, intellectual honesty and realism. With case histories from the real world – including such recent examples such as the diverging paths taken by Jamie Dimon at JPMorgan Chase and Charles Prince at Citigroup – Execution provides the realistic and hard-nosed approach to business success that could only come from authors as accomplished and insightful as Bossidy and Charan.

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  • Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap…and Others Don’t

    To find the keys to greatness, Collins’s 21-person research team read and coded 6,000 articles, generated more than 2,000 pages of interview transcripts and created 384 megabytes of computer data in a five-year project. The findings will surprise many readers and, quite frankly, upset others.

    The Challenge:
    Built to Last, the defining management study of the nineties, showed how great companies triumph over time and how long-term sustained performance can be engineered into the DNA of an enterprise from the verybeginning.

    But what about the company that is not born with great DNA? How can good companies, mediocre companies, even bad companies achieve enduring greatness?

    The Study:
    For years, this question preyed on the mind of Jim Collins. Are there companies that defy gravity and convert long-term mediocrity or worse into long-term superiority? And if so, what are the universal distinguishing characteristics that cause a company to go from good to great?

    The Standards:
    Using tough benchmarks, Collins and his research team identified a set of elite companies that made the leap to great results and sustained those results for at least fifteen years. How great? After the leap, the good-to-great companies generated cumulative stock returns that beat the general stock market by an average of seven times in fifteen years, better than twice the results delivered by a composite index of the world’s greatest companies, including Coca-Cola, Intel, General Electric, and Merck.

    The Comparisons:
    The research team contrasted the good-to-great companies with a carefully selected set of comparison companies that failed to make the leap from good to great. What was different? Why did one set of companies become truly great performers while the other set remained only good?

    Over five years, the team analyzed the histories of all twenty-eight companies in the study. After sifting through mountains of data and thousands of pages of interviews, Collins and his crew discovered the key determinants of greatness — why some companies make the leap and others don’t.

    The Findings:
    The findings of the Good to Great study will surprise many readers and shed light on virtually every area of management strategy and practice. The findings include:

    • Level 5 Leaders: The research team was shocked to discover the type of leadership required to achieve greatness.
    • The Hedgehog Concept: (Simplicity within the Three Circles): To go from good to great requires transcending the curse of competence.
    • A Culture of Discipline: When you combine a culture of discipline with an ethic of entrepreneurship, you get the magical alchemy of great results. Technology Accelerators: Good-to-great companies think differently about the role of technology.
    • The Flywheel and the Doom Loop: Those who launch radical change programs and wrenching restructurings will almost certainly fail to make the leap.

    “Some of the key concepts discerned in the study,” comments Jim Collins, “fly in the face of our modern business culture and will, quite frankly, upset some people.”

    Perhaps, but who can afford to ignore these findings?

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  • Harvard Business Review on Building Better Teams

    Most teams underperform. Yours can beat the odds.

    If you need the best practices and ideas for superior team building–but don’t have time to find them–this book is for you. Here are 10 inspiring and useful perspectives, all in one place.

    This collection of HBR articles will help you:

    – Boost team performance through mutual accountability
    – Motivate large, diverse groups to tackle complex projects
    – Increase groups’ emotional intelligence
    – Reverse the fortunes of a struggling team
    – Prevent decision deadlock
    – Extract results from a bunch of touchy superstars
    – Fight constructively with top-management colleagues
    – Ensure productivity in far-flung teams

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  • Out Of Stock

    Harvard Business Review on Inspiring & Executing Innovation (Harvard Business Review Paperback Series)

    Fresh ideas can mean big profits–but only if they make it to market and sell.

    If you need the best practices and ideas for creating and delivering new products and services–but don’t have time to find them–this book is for you. Here are 10 inspiring and useful perspectives, all in one place.

    This collection of HBR articles will help you:

    – Decide which ideas are worth pursuing

    – Adapt offerings from the developing world to wealthy markets

    – Plan all-new ventures by testing and tweaking

    – Tailor your efforts to meet customers’ most pressing needs

    – Make inexpensive products on a vast scale

    – Measure and improve innovation performance

    – Avoid classic pitfalls such as stifling innovation with rigid processes

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  • HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Change Management (HBR’s 10 Must Reads)

    Stop pushing products—and start cultivating relationships with the right customers.

    If you read nothing else on marketing that delivers competitive advantage, read these 10 articles. We’ve combed through hundreds of articles in the Harvard Business Review archive and selected the most important ones to help you reinvent your marketing by putting it—and your customers—at the center of your business.

    Leading experts such as Ted Levitt and Clayton Christensen provide the insights and advice you need to:

    • Figure out what business you’re really in
    • Create products that perform the jobs people need to get done
    • Get a bird’s-eye view of your brand’s strengths and weaknesses
    • Tap a market that’s larger than China and India combined
    • Deliver superior value to your B2B customers
    • End the war between sales and marketing

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  • HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Making Smart Decisions (HBR’s 10 Must Reads)

    Learn why bad decisions happen to good managers—and how to make better ones.

    If you read nothing else on decision making, read these 10 articles. We’ve combed through hundreds of articles in the Harvard Business Review archive and selected the most important ones to help you and your organization make better choices and avoid common traps.

    Leading experts such as Ram Charan, Michael Mankins, and Thomas Davenport provide the insights and advice you need to:

    • Make bold decisions that challenge the status quo
    • Support your decisions with diverse data
    • Evaluate risks and benefits with equal rigor
    • Check for faulty cause-and-effect reasoning
    • Test your decisions with experiments
    • Foster and address constructive criticism
    • Defeat indecisiveness with clear accountability

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  • HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Managing Yourself (HBR’s 10 Must Reads)

    The path to your professional success starts with a critical look in the mirror.

    If you read nothing else on managing yourself, read these 10 articles (plus the bonus article “How Will You Measure Your Life?” by Clayton M. Christensen). We’ve combed through hundreds of Harvard Business Review articles to select the most important ones to help you maximize yourself.

    HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Managing Yourself will inspire you to:

    Stay engaged throughout your 50+-year work life
    Tap into your deepest values
    Solicit candid feedback
    Replenish physical and mental energy
    Balance work, home, community, and self
    Spread positive energy throughout your organization
    Rebound from tough times
    Decrease distractibility and frenzy
    Delegate and develop employees’ initiative

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  • HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Strategic Marketing (HBR’s 10 Must Reads)

    Stop pushing products—and start cultivating relationships with the right customers.

    If you read nothing else on marketing that delivers competitive advantage, read these 10 articles. We’ve combed through hundreds of articles in the Harvard Business Review archive and selected the most important ones to help you reinvent your marketing by putting it—and your customers—at the center of your business.

    Leading experts such as Ted Levitt and Clayton Christensen provide the insights and advice you need to:

    • Figure out what business you’re really in
    • Create products that perform the jobs people need to get done
    • Get a bird’s-eye view of your brand’s strengths and weaknesses
    • Tap a market that’s larger than China and India combined
    • Deliver superior value to your B2B customers
    • End the war between sales and marketing

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  • HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Strategy (HBR’s 10 Must Reads)

    Is your company spending too much time on strategy development—with too little to show for it?

    If you read nothing else on strategy, read these 10 articles (featuring “What Is Strategy?” by Michael E. Porter). We’ve combed through hundreds of Harvard Business Review articles and selected the most important ones to help you catalyze your organization’s strategy development and execution.

    HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Strategy will inspire you to:

    • Distinguish your company from rivals
    • Clarify what your company will and won’t do
    • Craft a vision for an uncertain future
    • Create blue oceans of uncontested market space
    • Use the Balanced Scorecard to measure your strategy
    • Capture your strategy in a memorable phrase
    • Make priorities explicit
    • Allocate resources early
    • Clarify decision rights for faster decision making

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  • Out Of Stock

    HBR’S 10 Must Reads: The Essentials (HBR’s 10 Must Reads)

    Change is the one constant in business, and we must adapt or face obsolescence. Yet certain challenges never go away. That’s what makes this book “must read.” These are the 10 seminal articles by management’s most influential experts, on topics of perennial concern to ambitious managers and leaders hungry for inspiration–and ready to run with big ideas to accelerate their own and their companies’ success.

    If you read nothing else – full stop – read:

    • Michael Porter on creating competitive advantage and distinguishing your company from rivals
    • John Kotter on leading change through eight critical stages
    • Daniel Goleman on using emotional intelligence to maximize performance
    • Peter Drucker on managing your career by evaluating your own strengths and weaknesses
    • Clay Christensen on orchestrating innovation within established organizations
    • Tom Davenport on using analytics to determine how to keep your customers loyal
    • Robert Kaplan and David Norton on measuring your company’s strategy with the Balanced Scorecard
    • Rosabeth Moss Kanter on avoiding common mistakes when pushing innovation forward
    • Ted Levitt on understanding who your customers are and what they really want
    • C. K. Prahalad and Gary Hamel on identifying the unique, integrated systems that support your strategy
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  • Out Of Stock

    How The Mighty Fall: And Why Some Companies Never Give In – Hardcover

    Decline can be avoided.

    Decline can be detected.

    Decline can be reversed.

    Amidst the desolate landscape of fallen great companies, Jim Collins began to wonder: How do the mighty fall? Can decline be detected early and avoided? How far can a company fall before the path toward doom becomes inevitable and unshakable? How can companies reverse course?

    In How the Mighty Fall, Collins confronts these questions, offering leaders the well-founded hope that they can learn how to stave off decline and, if they find themselves falling, reverse their course. Collins’ research project—more than four years in duration—uncovered five step-wise stages of decline:

    Stage 1: Hubris Born of Success

    Stage 2: Undisciplined Pursuit of More

    Stage 3: Denial of Risk and Peril

    Stage 4: Grasping for Salvation

    Stage 5: Capitulation to Irrelevance or Death

    By understanding these stages of decline, leaders can substantially reduce their chances of falling all the way to the bottom.

    Great companies can stumble, badly, and recover.

    Every institution, no matter how great, is vulnerable to decline. There is no law of nature that the most powerful will inevitably remain at the top. Anyone can fall and most eventually do. But, as Collins’ research emphasizes, some companies do indeed recover—in some cases, coming back even stronger—even after having crashed into the depths of Stage 4.

    Decline, it turns out, is largely self-inflicted, and the path to recovery lies largely within our own hands. We are not imprisoned by our circumstances, our history, or even our staggering defeats along the way. As long as we never get entirely knocked out of the game, hope always remains. The mighty can fall, but they can often rise again.

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