• 60 Days of Power

    The book begins with a more detailed autobiography of his boyhood by the amiable PZ himself and continues with reflections by contributors on how the Late PZ Aginighan touched their lives. What better way to pay tribute! Each story from the different contributors exposes us to timeless biblical truths, scriptural references, and leadership lessons. As such, the book can be read as a devotional or as anecdotes of the inspirational life of the Odudu of Africa, Late PZ Aginighan.

    The stories were compiled by Dubamo Aginighan, his youngest son and author of Grace Vision and Unity; A Corper’s Story.

    55.00
  • Evangelism in Ghana — The Presbyterian Church of Ghana: 1942 – 1954

    First published in Twi in 1965

    Author’s note about the Book

    This book is the translation of an account of the last 12 years of the work of my father, the Rev. Emmanuel Victor Asihene in the Presbyterian Church of Ghana.

    It refers to his work as the First Evangelist Minister appointed by the Church at a critical time in its history. He wrote the book deliberately in Twi to make the story of the Evangelism Mission that he undertook readily accessible to all members of the Church.

    He was grateful to be assigned to carry out the Mission of Evangelism. In his own words, he explains:

    “On the day of my ordination in 1960, this verse, ‘I will tell of thy name to my brethren; in the midst of the congregation, I shall praise you,’ Psalm 22, verse 22 was my major vow and promise. With great joy therefore, I thank God that I have been chosen and given the chance to spread the word of the Lord, through Evangelism, here , in my own land, and among my own people.”

    At the time of his appointment, he had no doubt that “what was needed most was the grace and guidance of God and a great infusion with a personal spiritual strength.”

    The journeys that Rev. Asihene made, most of them on foot, to distant areas of the country were extensive — as can be seen from the list of places that he visited.

    Many of the difficult-to-read areas where he took the message of God are, even today, not readily identified on the map of Ghana. Accounts of his easy engagements with Church members, non-Christians and even with fetish priests are as fascinating as the return of backsliders, by the grace of God, into the Church.

    When I received and read my signed copy of the book 47 years ago in 1965, I knew that I would one day translate this unique record of extensive Evangelism by a local member of the Presbyterian Church in our own country, from Twi into a wider read language. I am glad and I consider it a great honour that I have been able to translate, into English, this important piece of history of the Presbyterian Church of Ghana.

    During this 125th Anniversary of his birth, this Translation of this book also marks the Dedication of the commemorative building, “The Rev. E.V. Asihene Quiet Room” at the Anum Presbyterian Secondary School, where he was Headmaster, about 90 years ago.

    — Letitia Eva Obeng (nee Asihene), January 2012

    40.00
  • Theophilus Opoku: Indigenous Pastor and Missionary Theologian, 1842-1913

    This is a brief but rich study of the life of one of the significant early indigenous ministers of the gospel in the Gold Coast. Opoku was born a year before the arrival in Akropong-Akuapem of the West Indians who were recruited by the Basel Mission, a development that marked the beginning of successful Basel Mission work in the Gold Coast after the persistent failure since 1828.

    This work, though constrained by legitimate factors of time and length, is nevertheless based on primary sourced. It offers a portrait of Theophilus Opoku that is real and fascinating, and underscores the fact that the goals that the Basel Mission sent its missionaries to the Gold Coast to pursue could be achieved by local or ‘native’ people already immersed in their own culture. Opoku’s life and ministry as presented here confirm that a theologian is not necessarily one who produces theological treatises but one who in daily life and work makes a definite impact that is only feasible through a real engagement of his Christian faith with the existential issues of his cultural context.

    Opoku engaged with people of other faiths, whether the primal religion or Islam, and there are lessons to be learnt from this study in how he approached those engagements. — Rev. Dr. Benhardt Y. Quarshie, Rector, Akrofi-Christaller Institute of Theology, Mission and Culture, Akropong-Akuapem, Ghana

    25.00

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