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    Becoming

    An intimate, powerful, and inspiring memoir by the former First Lady of the United States.

    In a life filled with meaning and accomplishment, Michelle Obama has emerged as one of the most iconic and compelling women of our era. As First Lady of the United States of America—the first African-American to serve in that role—she helped create the most welcoming and inclusive White House in history, while also establishing herself as a powerful advocate for women and girls in the U.S. and around the world, dramatically changing the ways that families pursue healthier and more active lives, and standing with her husband as he led America through some of its most harrowing moments. Along the way, she showed us a few dance moves, crushed Carpool Karaoke, and raised two down-to-earth daughters under an unforgiving media glare.

    In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites readers into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her—from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work, to her time spent at the world’s most famous address. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it—in her own words and on her own terms.

    Warm, wise, and revelatory, Becoming is the deeply personal reckoning of a woman of soul and substance who has steadily defied expectations—and whose story inspires us to do the same.

    130.00140.00

    Becoming

    130.00140.00
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  • Is There Not A Cause…To Rant?

    If talking about Ghana is a dice, Ace comes up tops.

    Few lawyers engage the socio-political issues of their day as Ace Ankomah does. Ever since he gifted his voice and pen to the public cause, Ace has dissected, analysed and proffered solutions to national issues with a patriotic joie de vivre. Indeed, it is said that he invests as much effort on his clients’ cases as he does on the national front. Or does he?

    Ace has participated in street demonstrations, has written, has debated, has sung, and has coined phrases which have gained currency in the national conversation. In this no-holds-barred journey through beautifully written essays, one encounters a writer burdened with the frustrations of a boxer whose hands have been held from behind, the frustration of not being able to punch crass illogicality. And so he rants. From constitutional lacunas to the paradox of cocoa, from building permits to the dilemma of akpeteshie, from ethnicity to the degraded texture of Milo…

    Is There Not A Cause…to Rant? is what happens when a stammering, public-spirited private legal practitioner clears his chest about the Ghana he so dearly loves.

    60.00
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  • Death and Pain: Rawlings’ Ghana – The Inside Story

    “On 30 December 1981, the Ghana Armed Forces held a party at the Ministry of Defence at Burma Camp. The President, Dr. Hilla Limann, had been invited, but because of the security situation in the country he was advised not to attend. Around 3 p.m. the President changed his mind and decided to attend the party. It was not until around midnight that he returned to his official residence at the Castle.

    “Around this time, 10 soldiers, some retired, all other ranks, gathered some two miles to the south of the Camp waiting for grenades and other ammunition from their accomplices at the First Infantry Battalion at Michel Camp, about 20 miles to the East of their position. They never turned up. At about 2 a.m. on 31 December 1981, the small group decided to move. Their objective: to seize the country and form a new government.

    “Leaving the Labadi beach in the neighbourhood of the Teshie Military Range, the handful of coupmakers moved through the bush to the Recce Cookhouse. Among them were C.C. Addae, Matthew Adabuga, Gbofah, Braimah, Alidu Gyiwah, Sammy Amedeka and Allieu. Jerry Rawlings was already in Burma Camp hiding in the room of Adabuga at the Gondar Barracks…”

    Do you want a first-hand account from the murderers of the 3 judges and officer whilst they were in Nsawam Prison waiting to be executed by firing squad? Do you want to see the list of Ghanaians who went ‘missing’ during the Revolution? A relevant piece of Ghana history is in this book.

     

    60.00
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    It Takes A Woman

    It Takes a Woman retraces the early life of Agyeman‐Rawlings who rose to prominence as the First Lady of the Republic of Ghana (1982-2000). She redefined the privilege of serving a nation, and sought every platform to champion the causes of underserved citizenry and women. While her husband, former President Jerry John Rawlings, embarked on a relentless pursuit of transforming Ghana into a model of African democracy, Mrs. Agyeman-Rawlings founded the 31st December Women’s Movement (the 31st DWM), an organisation which played a pivotal role in the empowerment of women, and in addressing issues of systemic gender inequality, not only in Ghana but across the African region.

    Born in an era when women were overtly marginalised, Nana Konadu Agyeman-Rawlings’ strong relationship with her father, mother and family elders formed the core of much of her formative years. Fortified by her unique family history, she was raised to never accept the notion that there were some things she could not do, simply because she was a woman.”

    The narrative captures the family history of a spirited little girl, and as she walks us through the refreshingly detailed scenes from her childhood, we are transported to a hopeful and quintessential Ghana, where a sense of national pride resounded powerfully at the time of independence. But as she recalls Ghana’s struggles post-independence, we are also confronted face to face with her juxtaposed emotions of elation and frustration, hurt and joy, certainty and dread. She was not to know that her personal life being upended early one morning in 1979 would also become a turning point in the nation’s history and would thrust her into the glare of international publicity.

    It Takes a Woman, written with unflinching candour, is an absorbing portrait of a life devoted to public service and shaped by heritage. Above all, it is an account of resilience. The voices of the women who stood tall will forever inspire Agyeman-Rawlings to stand for many more whose voices may not be loud enough to stand on their own.

    150.00160.00

    It Takes A Woman

    150.00160.00
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  • Hot

    Fela: This Bitch of A Life

    “I’ve never met a more fearless, direct, activist, fiercely radical, rebel, courageous warrior, prolific, and gifted person like FELA. I admired his honesty, was often puzzled by his contradictory lifestyle, was in total awe of his musical genius, relished his outrageous sense of humour, deeply treasured his friendship and was absolutely inspired by his fathomless generosity. This Bitch of a Life illustrates an extremely heartbreaking phase in this incredibly gifted master musician’s experiences. It is filled with so many occasions of savage torture on FELA’s soul, being and psyche: trumped up criminal charges, military onslaught, seamless court appearances. Kangaroo-court convictions and imprisonment accompanied by a nauseating inhumanity that caused FELA unimaginable misery.” — Hugh Masekela, Musician and Friend

    African superstar, composer, singer, and musician, as well as mystic and political activist, Nigerian Fela Kuti, born in 1938, was controversy personified.

    He was swept to international celebrity on a wave of scandal and flamboyance, and when he died of AIDS in 1997, more than a million people attended his funeral. But what was he really like, this man who could as easily arouse violent hostility as he could unswerving loyalty?

    Carlos Moore’s unique biography, based on hours of conversation and told in Fela’s first-person vernacular, reveals the icon’s complex personality and tumultuous existence. Moore includes interviews with fifteen of his queens (wives); photos; and an updated discography.

    105.00
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  • The Legend: Kwame Nkrumah

    Age Range: 8 – 12 years

    Kwame Nkrumah was Ghana’s first prime minister and first president. He led the country to independence in 1957 and achieved a lot for his people. He also championed the struggle for Africa’s independence, working hard to unite the continent. He remains one of the most outstanding and respected leaders in Africa.

    Nkrumah was voted Africa’s Man of he Millennium by BBC listeners in 2000.

    15.00
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  • The Trial of J.J. Rawlings: Echoes of the 31st December Revolution (2nd Edition)

    The Trial of JJ Rawlings narrates the extraordinary circumstances under which a young military officer Flt Lt JJ Rawlings, later to become the longest serving Head of State of Ghana, shot into the limelight to change the course of Ghana’s history and political development.The first edition of the book, originally published in 1986, completely sold out within a year, making this second edition very welcome in response to public request.

    This volume is a valuable contribution to our understanding of those ineluctable forces that have changed the contours of our society. Surely, the story of JJ, well told in this volume, cannot fail to grip and hold the reader’s most concentrated attention. – Prof F.A. Botchwey, PhD

    50.00
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  • From Third World to First: Singapore and the Asian Economic Boom

    Few gave tiny Singapore much chance of survival when it was granted independence in 1965. How is it, then, that today the former British colonial trading post is a thriving Asian metropolis with not only the world’s number one airline, best airport, and busiest port of trade, but also the world’s fourth–highest per capita real income?

    The story of that transformation is told here by Singapore’s charismatic, controversial founding father, Lee Kuan Yew. Rising from a legacy of divisive colonialism, the devastation of the Second World War, and general poverty and disorder following the withdrawal of foreign forces, Singapore now is hailed as a city of the future. This miraculous history is dramatically recounted by the man who not only lived through it all but who fearlessly forged ahead and brought about most of these changes.

    Delving deep into his own meticulous notes, as well as previously unpublished government papers and official records, Lee details the extraordinary efforts it took for an island city–state in Southeast Asia to survive at that time.

    Lee explains how he and his cabinet colleagues finished off the communist threat to the fledgling state’s security and began the arduous process of nation building: forging basic infrastructural roads through a land that still consisted primarily of swamps, creating an army from a hitherto racially and ideologically divided population, stamping out the last vestiges of colonial–era corruption, providing mass public housing, and establishing a national airline and airport.

    In this illuminating account, Lee writes frankly about his trenchant approach to political opponents and his often unorthodox views on human rights, democracy, and inherited intelligence, aiming always “to be correct, not politically correct.” Nothing in Singapore escaped his watchful eye: whether choosing shrubs for the greening of the country, restoring the romance of the historic Raffles Hotel, or openly, unabashedly persuading young men to marry women as well educated as themselves. Today’s safe, tidy Singapore bears Lee’s unmistakable stamp, for which he is unapologetic: “If this is a nanny state, I am proud to have fostered one.”

    Though Lee’s domestic canvas in Singapore was small, his vigor and talent assured him a larger place in world affairs. With inimitable style, he brings history to life with cogent analyses of some of the greatest strategic issues of recent times and reveals how, over the years, he navigated the shifting tides of relations among America, China, and Taiwan, acting as confidant, sounding board, and messenger for them. He also includes candid, sometimes acerbic pen portraits of his political peers, including the indomitable Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan, the poetry–spouting Jiang Zemin, and ideologues George Bush and Deng Xiaoping.

    Lee also lifts the veil on his family life and writes tenderly of his wife and stalwart partner, Kwa Geok Choo, and of their pride in their three children –– particularly the eldest son, Hsien Loong, who is now Singapore’s deputy prime minister.

    For more than three decades, Lee Kuan Yew has been praised and vilified in equal measure, and he has established himself as a force impossible to ignore in Asian and international politics. From Third World to First offers readers a compelling glimpse into this visionary’s heart, soul, and mind.

    100.00
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  • Kwame Nkrumah: The Great African

    Most books on Kwame Nkrumah have been written with the adult in mind. This biography, however, has been written specially for the young reader. The aim is to trace the development of this unforgettable son of Africa from childhood to adulthood — his beliefs, achievements and contribution to the liberation of Africa from colonial rule.

    We have also tried to explain his place in the history of the world. Students in schools and teacher training colleges as well as young readers would find this volume very captivating and full of insight.

    15.00
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  • Strength in the Storm: When A Loved One Dies

    When a loved one dies, there are no words to describe the feeling. Through all the pain and heartache, having to deal with the routine of everyday life can make the situation even harder to bear.

    From the intriguing details of the Widowhood Rites, to the final journey from pain to purpose, this soulful experience story ignites a flame of hope in times of adversity.

    Indeed, in each and every paragraph of this book, the author connotes an unwavering strength that she acquired in the midst of her storm; an encouragement to others that they can pass through such a painful loss, conquer their fears, and come out even stronger.

    40.00
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  • The Legend: Nelson Mandela

    Age Range: 8 – 12 years

    This story captures the life of Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela and his struggle against apartheid and its attendant harsh effects on South Africans. The author takes time to trace Mandela’s history from childhood, through his prison experiences and fight against oppression, till his eventual attainment of Presidency of South Africa.

    It is beautifully illustrated and written not only for children but for the young at heart who may not have full knowledge of the character of Nelson Mandela.

    15.00
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  • Unfinished Journey: The Life and Times of VCRAC Crabbe

    Otumfuo Osei Tutu II, Asantehene, says this about the book:

    “The Life of Justice Crabbe has surely not been all rosy. He has suffered painfully from people who envied and misunderstood him. But through it all, he came out better, fearless and incurably optimistic. We learn from some of his painful experiences recounted in this book that misfortune is only a missed-fortune. We should always believe as individuals and as a nation that the best is yet to come! Clearly, part of his secret for aging so gracefully is being content with the lot that life grants him and not to carry any negative emotions in his body.”

    80.00
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