• The Legend: Kwame Nkrumah

    Age Range: 8 – 12 years

    Kwame Nkrumah was Ghana’s first prime minister and first president. He led the country to independence in 1957 and achieved a lot for his people. He also championed the struggle for Africa’s independence, working hard to unite the continent. He remains one of the most outstanding and respected leaders in Africa.

    Nkrumah was voted Africa’s Man of he Millennium by BBC listeners in 2000.

    GHS 15.00
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    Is There Not A Cause…To Rant?

    If talking about Ghana is a dice, Ace comes up tops.

    Few lawyers engage the socio-political issues of their day as Ace Ankomah does. Ever since he gifted his voice and pen to the public cause, Ace has dissected, analysed and proffered solutions to national issues with a patriotic joie de vivre. Indeed, it is said that he invests as much effort on his clients’ cases as he does on the national front. Or does he?

    Ace has participated in street demonstrations, has written, has debated, has sung, and has coined phrases which have gained currency in the national conversation. In this no-holds-barred journey through beautifully written essays, one encounters a writer burdened with the frustrations of a boxer whose hands have been held from behind, the frustration of not being able to punch crass illogicality. And so he rants. From constitutional lacunas to the paradox of cocoa, from building permits to the dilemma of akpeteshie, from ethnicity to the degraded texture of Milo…

    Is There Not A Cause…to Rant? is what happens when a stammering, public-spirited private legal practitioner clears his chest about the Ghana he so dearly loves.

    GHS 54.00GHS 60.00
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  • The Trial of J.J. Rawlings: Echoes of the 31st December Revolution

    The Trial of J.J. Rawlings is a fascinating book about a most fascinating period of Ghana’s history, at the centre of which stands the fascinating personality of J.J. Rawlings. This book was a sensation when it was published thirty-two years ago. It was a bestseller in Ghana and a most sought-after book by Ghanaians everywhere as well as people who, for whatever reason, had an interest in Ghana. This is because the book unlocked (or at least tried to unlock) the enigma of Jerry John Rawlings to the extent that it was possible so to do.

    Almost a complete generation later, the book is even more relevant today than when it was first published; the story of Jerry Rawlings and the period of the AFRC and early PNDC periods remains only partially told. Indeed, the social and economic dynamics that produced June 4th have also receded into the mists of time, and with them the man at the centre of this tale. Therefore, the story this book tells has acquired a new urgency and become a national requirement.

    NANA KWASI GYAN-APENTENG
    CHAIRMAN, NATIONAL MEDIA COMMISSION

    GHS 40.00
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  • The Legend: Nelson Mandela

    Age Range: 8 – 12 years

    This story captures the life of Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela and his struggle against apartheid and its attendant harsh effects on South Africans. The author takes time to trace Mandela’s history from childhood, through his prison experiences and fight against oppression, till his eventual attainment of Presidency of South Africa.

    It is beautifully illustrated and written not only for children but for the young at heart who may not have full knowledge of the character of Nelson Mandela.

    GHS 15.00
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  • Sam: A Life of Service to God and Country

    In this memoir, Sam Okudzeto shares experiences from a life of service to Ghana, and provides unique insights from a life spent on the front lines.
    “Uncle Sam as some of us know him is iconic. He is larger than life in his profession, his faith and his service to humanity. His memoir deepens our respect for his intellect and joie de vivre and provide steps for us to emulate his rich and blessed life.” – Rev. Dr. Joyce Aryee, Executive Director, Salt & Light Ministries, Management and Communications Consultant
    “There are people you meet in life who change you. Their goodness, their kindness, their willingness to speak out for what is just and right make you look at the world in a different light. They inspire you simply by being themselves. Sam is one of those persons in my life. He is a giant in the field of law. In the fifteen years I have known him I have witnessed endless times where he has brought insight and compassion and leadership to the issues at hand. I have been in awe of Sam for these many years. Someone once said that fate chooses out relatives, we choose our friends. My friendship with Sam is cherished gift.” – Dr. Mark S. Ellis, Executive Director, International Bar Association
    “Sam’s reputation as a redoubtable and fearless advocate for the rule the law, truth and integrity has won him the respect and admiration of his peers, juniors and even his harshest critics. He is indeed a legal colossus, a true patriot with a strong moral character and an unswerving passion for pursuing the cause of right without fear of might. He is a very warm and wonderful, human being – a selfless, compassionate lover of people who seeks the good, happiness and progress of others. Above all else, Sam is a man of faith who loves the Lord with all his heart.” – Her Ladyship Georgina T. Wood, Former Chief Justice of Ghana
    GHS 100.00
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  • The Persistence of Paradox: Memoirs of F.L. Bartels

    Francis Bartels is a man of many, many parts. As Headmaster of one of Ghana’s great schools, he was wisely strict and strictly wise. This excellent book shows that he has stamped his personality on fields as far apart as educational policy, linguistics and diplomacy. Yet he is also a romantic, a humorist, a family man, as well as a keen analyst of his origins and ancestry.

    Perhaps there is a certain Dutch caution in his committee work and strategic statements at educational conferences. Perhaps there is also a profound desire for order and purpose, and a liking for a job well done, which pays tribute to his German forebears. It certainly paid off at his beloved school, Mfantsipim, where Kofi Annan, current UN Secretary-General, was once his pupil.

    Perhaps there is a recognizable Englishness in Francis Bartel’s affability, his dislike of tyranny, and his respect for those fraternal connections which lighten the load of educators and administrators across the world.

    There is clearly beauty and lucidity in the prose that he uses to describe the paradoxes encountered in a long life full of varied achievements. He was honoured by the United Kingdom that helped to educate him. He was welcomed across Africa and the United States of America as a speaker on education at all levels. He was appointed as a high-ranking staff member of UNESCO and as his country’s Ambassador to the Federal Republic of Germany.

    Thus, Francis Bartels is that admirable product of the twentieth century — a citizen of the world. In his fascinating story, we see him employ all the skills and qualities mentioned above to ensure his survival in various challenging environments. And this, he will agree, is firmly rooted in h is Africanness which is inspired by his abiding vision of excellence.

    GHS 100.00
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  • Patriotism and Nation Building: Perspectives from the Life and Utterances of Ephraim Amu

    The deepest and most significant aspect of the heritage of any nation lies in her people. A people’s dignity, worth and value can be measured by their human resources. More important than mineral wealth, more significant than financial capital and of more value than land and property, are the leaders of thought and character, that a communal or social group can lay claim to. Towering above the tallest buildings, reaching deeper than the roots of ancient trees, are society’s icons, doyens of a people’s life and culture. Often unrecognized in their lifetime, sometimes vilified or else silenced by political forces, these persons represent a people’s legacy and gift to humankind. Such was Dr. Ephraim Amu, native of Peki Avetile, son of West Africa’s “Gold Coast”, scholar, teacher, musician, ethicist, and preacher.

    In this book, Prof. Laryea has by careful and detailed research, rendered an invaluable service to posterity in unearthing and making available the life, works and public speeches of Dr Ephraim Amu. Thoughtfully selecting over sixty of Amu’s sermons spanning a period of 50 years (1937 – 1986), Laryea enables us to more deeply enter the inner thoughts and expressions of one of Ghana’s most illustrious sons, thus allowing us into the veritable engine room of the composer of Ghana’s national song, “Yân ara asase ni”, crafted by Amu in 1929. In doing so he has also opened up and thrown light upon very significant periods in the nation’s history.

    GHS 120.00
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  • The Legend: Fela Anikulapo-Kuti

    Age Range: 8 – 12 years

    This book chronicles the birth, political struggles, music career and the overall development of an enigma. This vocal political activist was above all a brilliant world renowned Nigerian musician.

    The book captures the character of Fela Anikulapo Kuti from his childhood, through the storms he faces, to his eventual attainment of stardom in his profession.

    This book is colourfully illustrated and would be of interest to general readership.

    GHS 18.00
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  • Kwame Nkrumah: The Great African

    Most books on Kwame Nkrumah have been written with the adult in mind. This biography, however, has been written specially for the young reader. The aim is to trace the development of this unforgettable son of Africa from childhood to adulthood — his beliefs, achievements and contribution to the liberation of Africa from colonial rule.

    We have also tried to explain his place in the history of the world. Students in schools and teacher training colleges as well as young readers would find this volume very captivating and full of insight.

    GHS 15.00
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  • Six Strings and a Note: Legendary Agya Koo Nimo in His Own Words

    Six Strings and a Note is a compelling and relevant portrait of the artistic life of Daniel Kwabena Boa Amponsah, known around the world by his stage name, Koo Nimo. Written with a curiosity, simplicity, and a keen memory for detail, the book takes us on a journey through Koo Nimo’s work as an artist, and also as a man with a deep affection for his culture.

    From the quiet Ghanaian village where he grew up, to the popular concert halls, leading international universities and renowned institutions, Koo Nimo’s life is nearly a century of extraordinary subplots to a story of hope, determination, and a boundless love for guitar music.

    Celebrated in his native Ghana for his infusion of traditional motifs into mainstream music, and his influence on the Addadam music styles and palm-wine guitar, Koo Nimo unveiled Asante culture to audiences all over the world.

    A fine blend of a vivid recollection of a memoir and an authenticity woven into a biography to give the reader a richer encounter with Koo Nimo’s life lessons, challenges, and successes through his life and work.

    A father, a poet, a folk musician, a teacher, and a philosopher, Koo Nimo would say, “I did not set out to become another [Andres] Segovia. All I have is my culture, my story and my song, and I have to do my best for the sake of a generation who will be listening and learning long after I am gone.”

    A must-read for all international music enthusiasts.

    GHS 80.00
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  • Dark Days in Ghana

    The final book by Kwame Nkrumah, Ghana’s first President, this records his experiences after he was over thrown in a coup d’etat.

    GHS 50.00
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  • Tuesday’s Child: A Memoir

    Mary Ashun’s Tuesday’s Child is the story of a girl born in the small West African country of Ghana. She has big dreams, a large boisterous, extended family and a tendency towards asking questions that children, especially girls aren’t supposed to ask. Boarding school days, interminable church services and a famine that leaves her thin enough to be an ’80’s model are all narrated with such candid humor that it’s hard to believe there were any scars.

    Now older, wiser, with a family of her own and living in North America, she embarks on a journey back to Ghana. The mission: to make peace. Who with? The answer might surprise you and this is why this is balanced African storytelling at its best!

    GHS 25.00
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