• New

    Ama’s Dream

    Age Range: 6 – 10 years

    On a cold rainy night, Ama goes to bed eager for a goodnight’s sleep. That night she enters and roams new lands with her best friend Dakoa. Ama and Dakoa are amazed by what exists in the land of dreams. They meet an old woman who changes their life forever. Would you like to come along with Ama to this wonderful happy place? If only you’d close your eyes, you’ll find that there is magic all around us.

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    Ama’s Dream

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  • New

    Kofi and the Crow (Red Oak Young Readers’ Series)

    Age Range: 6 – 8 years

    The Red Oak Young Readers’ Series features engaging stories with captivating illustrations that appeals to even the most reluctant young readers. This Series is designed to enhance the creative abilities of children by stimulating their imagination. Using very simple and lively language, the Series builds the confidence of beginner readers and motivates them to develop their vocabulary. Parents of children in kindergarten will find that their children will ask for the stories in this series to be read to them over and again.

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  • New

    Afua and the Mouse (Red Oak Young Readers’ Series)

    Age Range: 6 – 8 years

    The Red Oak Young Readers’ Series features engaging stories with captivating illustrations that appeals to even the most reluctant young readers. This Series is designed to enhance the creative abilities of children by stimulating their imagination. Using very simple and lively language, the Series builds the confidence of beginner readers and motivates them to develop their vocabulary. Parents of children in kindergarten will find that their children will ask for the stories in this series to be read to them over and again.

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  • New

    King of the Trees

    Age Range: 10 – 14 years

    The King of all Trees wants to introduce himself to all who are willing to listen. The Creator Himself crowned this great King. Perhaps, you are more familiar with him than you think. If you will listen closely, you will understand why he is the King of the trees and you will learn how to be as great as this king.

     

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  • New

    Obenewa

    Age Range: 6 – 10 years

    Obenewa’s mother dies while giving birth to her.  She is left with no one but Maa Kaedabi, her grandmother. A time comes when Obenewa leaves her village with an old friend of Maa Kaedabi. She is now in the big city, there is so much change around her. The big city can be a lonely place for a motherless young girl; it can also be a hub of opportunities for achieving one’s aspirations. What does the city hold for Obenewa?

     

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    Obenewa

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  • New

    The End of a Traitor

    Age Range: 6 – 10 years

    Foriwa worked as a maid in Queen Pokua’s palace. Due to her truthful and hardworking nature, the Queen honours her. Foriwa’s life changes; she becomes a Princess as well as heiress to the throne.  Her good fortune is met with mixed feelings by the townspeople. In the face of rumors of a palace coup, Queen Pokua realizes that a traitor has been set loose in her Kingdom.  The traitor could be anyone; and no one can be trusted.

     

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  • New

    The Harmattan Man

    Age Range: 10 – 14 years

    The children of Tanoso are looking forward to a very exciting Christmas party. Their mothers are busy preparing lots of goodies for the party.

    The only snag is that the dry Harmattan wind gets worse every day. It does not show any sign of going away before Christmas day.

    A worried Jeneba goes searching for the Harmattan man to persuade him to stay away on the day set for the party so that they can have good weather and enjoy the party.

    Does she find the Harmattan-man? Does he agree to go away on the day set for the party?

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  • Hot

    Grace & Family

    Age Range: 4 – 8 years

    To Grace, family has always meant her Ma, her Nana and a cat called Paw-Paw. So when Papa invites her to visit him in The Gambia, she dreams of finding a fairy-tale family straight out of her story books. But, as Nana reminds her, families are what you make them…

    By the author and illustrator of international bestseller Amazing Grace.

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    Grace & Family

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  • New

    Chidi Only Likes Blue: An African Book of Colours

    Age Range: 5 – 9 years

    Nneka’s little brother Chidi is always saying that his favourite color is blue. When Nneka asks him why, he replies, “because the sky is blue and my best shirt is blue.”

    So Nneka decides to teach him about other colors seen in their village — red for the chiefs’ caps, yellow for the “gari they eat, brown for the “okwe game board — and to tell him why she likes them.

    Ifeoma Onyefulu here introduces young readers to a rainbow palette, African style, with warm words and photographs offering a colorful glimpse of Nigerian village life.

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  • The Boy who Spat in Sargrenti’s Eye

    Winner of Burt Award for African Literature

    Sargrenti is the name by which Major General Sir Garnet Wolseley, KCMG (1833 – 1913) is still known in the West African state of Ghana.

    Kofi Gyan, the 15-year old boy who spits in Sargrenti’s eye, is the nephew of the chief of Elmina, a town on the Atlantic coast of Ghana. On Christmas Day, 1871, Kofi’s godfather gives him a diary as a Christmas present and charges him with the task of keeping a personal record of the momentous events through which they are living. This novel is a transcription of Kofi’s diary.

    Elmina town has a long-standing relationship with the Castelo de São Jorge da Mina, known today as Elmina Castle, built by the Portuguese in 1482 and captured from them by the Dutch in 1637.

    In April, 1872, the Dutch hand over the unprofitable castle to the British. The people of Elmina have not been consulted and resist the change. On June 13, 1873 British forces punish them by bombarding the town and destroying it. (It has never been rebuilt. The flat open ground where it once stood serves as a constant reminder of the savage power of Imperial Britain.)

    After the destruction of Elmina, Kofi moves to his mother’s family home in nearby Cape Coast, seat of the British colonial government, where Sargrenti is preparing to march inland and attack the independent Asante state. There Melton Prior, war artist of the London weekly news magazine, The Illustrated London News, offers Kofi a job as his assistant. This gives the lad an opportunity to observe at close quarters not only Prior but also the other war correspondents, Henry Morton Stanley and G. A. Henty. Kofi witnesses and experiences the trauma of a brutal war, a run-up to the formal colonialism which would be realized ten years later at the 1885 Berlin conference, where European powers drew lines on the map of Africa, dividing the territory up amongst themselves.

    On February 6, 1874, Sargrenti’s troops loot the palace of the Asante king, Kofi Karikari, and then blow up the stone building and set the city of Kumase on fire, razing it to the ground.

    Kofi’s story culminates in his angry response to the British auction of their loot in Cape Coast Castle. The loot includes the solid gold mask shown on the front cover of the novel. That mask continues to reside in the Wallace Collection in London.

    The invasion of Asante met with the enthusiastic approval of the British public, which elevated Wolseley to the status of a national hero. All the war correspondents and several military officers hastened to cash in on public sentiment by publishing books telling the story of their victory. In all of these, without exception, the coastal Fante feature as feckless and cowardly and the Asante as ruthless savages.

    The Boy who Spat in Sargrenti’s Eye tells the story of these momentous events for the first time from an African point of view. It is told with irony and with occasional flashes of humor. The novel is illustrated with scans of seventy engravings first published in The Illustrated London News.

    This book won a Burt Award for African Literature which included the donation by the Ghana Book Trust of 3000 copies to school libraries in Ghana. In 2016, at the annual conference of the African Literature Association held in Atlanta, GA, it received the ALA’s Creative Book of the Year Award.

    Prof. Kwesi Kwaa Prah writes:“The Boy who Spat in Sargrenti’s War takes history out of the recesses of memory and obscurity, and expresses it in vivid and dazzling light.”

    The Boy who Spat in Sargrenti’s Eye is a story for adults of all ages, both young adults and those no longer so young.

     

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  • Brave Music of a Distant Drum

    In Brave Music of a Distant Drum, a blind old slave woman, Ama, summons her son to come and write down her story so that her granddaughter and her granddaughter’s children can one day read it and know their history.

    Ama’s son, Kwame Zumbi – named Zacharias Williams by the white Christians who raised him – considers her an ugly old pagan and has little interest in doing more than is necessary to fulfill his obligation to her. How he is changed by the acts of hearing and writing down the details of his mother’s story is as powerful and important a story as Ama’s.

    The story of an African enslaved in Brazil, Ama’s story is violent – it includes murder, rape, and betrayal – and yet it is also a story of courage, hope, determination, and love.

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  • Akosua and Osman

    “Karatu, farkonka madaci, karshenka zuma.” (Study is difficult but the rewards are great.)

    Akosua Annan is a confident and fiercely intelligent student at a posh girls’ school in Cape Coast, Ghana. There she comes under the influence of a charismatic feminist teacher.

    Osman Said’s background is very different. Upon the death of his parents, a police sergeant and an unschooled market trader, immigrants to Accra from the North, he is adopted by a retired school teacher, Hajia Zainab. After a spell as an apprentice in an auto workshop, he returns to school. There, finding the teaching inadequate, he becomes an avid reader and educates himself.

    Akosua and Osman are thrown together by chance in the course of a school visit to the slave dungeon at Cape Coast Castle. Their paths cross again as finalists in the national school debating competition where the subject is “The problem of poverty in Ghana is insoluble.” They meet for the third time as students at the University of Ghana and as we leave them, it looks as if their relationship might develop into something permanent.

    “This fascinating novel tells the story of how these two young people from these disparate backgrounds are brought together as if by an unseen hand, in a process that teaches us about our history, our common humanity despite ethnic differences, the need to pursue our ambitions, the strength of human sexuality and the need for self-discipline, and, above all, the power of love.” The Judges, Burt Award for African Literature, 2011

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