• Hot

    A Dream I Had

    Age Range: 6 – 10 years

    Samira wakes up one morning to find an empty house. Where is everyone? She wonders.

    Where have they all gone? How would she get to school early enough to write her exams?

    There comes her transport: a beautiful horse and its rider.

    Find out how she gets to school and all that ensues thereafter.

     

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    A Dream I Had

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  • Hot

    A Friend In Need Is A Friend Indeed

    Age Range: 10 – 13 years

    Fiifi and his two friends, Kakra and Panyin are neighbours. In an Art and Craft class, Fiifi cannot mold his clay pot. He asks Panyin to help him complete his art work over the weekend, but Panyin gives a thousand and one reasons why he cannot help.

    With Kakra’s guide, Fiifi is able to mold a beautiful pot. This pot turns out to be the best among the lot. Fiifi is pleased with himself and thankful to Kakra who helped him. Mr. Kumah awards him the highest marks.

    Where is Panyin? He cannot share in Fiifi’s joy because he did not help when he was needed most. He sits under the tree all by himself, and away from the fun and cheers.

    Fiifi now knows who can indeed be called a friend.

    The stories in this series Idioms in Expression aim at giving children a better understanding of idiomatic expressions. Since these idioms form the main theme for the story, it becomes easy for the reader to understand the contexts within which such expressions should be used.

    Coupled with this learning experience are the exciting story lines which do not only portray the familiar African culture, but also provide a wide vocabulary for readers’ use.

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  • Hot

    Better Late than Never

    Age Range: 8 – 12 years

    In Better Late than Never, Daakyehene is to attend an interview but wakes up a bit too late on the day set for the interview.

    For this reason, he decides that he will not attend. His mother urges him on to give it a try nonetheless.

    What happens at the interview? Was it worth the try? Is it really better late than never?

    The stories in this series Idioms in Expression aim at giving children a better understanding of idiomatic expressions. Since these idioms form the main theme for the story, it becomes easy for the reader to understand the contexts within which such expressions should be used.

    Coupled with this learning experience are the exciting story lines which do not only portray the familiar African culture, but also provide a wide vocabulary for readers’ use.

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  • Hot

    Lost in the Forest

    Age Range: 10 – 14 years

    A girl goes snail-hunting with friends and soon finds out that she is all alone in the forest. A search is mounted for her and she is found dumb in an old man’s hut.

    Who is this old man and how did she end up in his hut? Why did no one know of his dealings with the youth in the village?

    In solving these mysteries, each member of society gleans one lesson or the other for community living.

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  • Hot

    Make Hay While the Sun Shines

    Age Range: 8 – 12 years

    In Make Hay while the Sun Shines, Ofoi learns his lesson the hard way. He always sneaks out to play when he has work to do.

    He has had his way for so long but the last straw that breaks the camel’s back is when he leaves his homework undone and goes to play “chaskele.” By the time he comes home in the evening, the lights are off. That is when he gets a good whack from his mother; one that puts him to sleep.

    The stories in this series Idioms in Expression aim at giving children a better understanding of idiomatic expressions. Since these idioms form the main theme for the story, it becomes easy for the reader to understand the contexts within which such expressions should be used.

    Coupled with this learning experience are the exciting story lines which do not only portray the familiar African culture, but also provide a wide vocabulary for readers’ use.

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  • Nissi Publications Book Set (7 books)

    For children between 6 and 11 years.

    Books in this set are:

    A Friend in Need Is A Friend Indeed

    A Dream I Had

    Red Hot Pepper

    Lost in the Forest

    One High School Adventure

    Make Hay While the Sun Shines

    Those Who Live in Glass Houses Should Not Throw Stones

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  • Hot

    One High School Adventure

    Age Range: 10 – 14 years

    Ama is a brilliant student who passes her exams with excellent grades. However, she cannot go to her first choice school for SHS due to financial constraints and so settles for another.

    In school, she falls in love. The demands of keeping a relationship take a toll on her grades. How does she get back on her feet to overcome this challenge and come out with flying colours?

    A book full of everyday challenges of growing up. Lessons: self-evaluation and perseverance are key.

    10.00
  • Hot

    Red Hot Pepper

    Age Range: 5 – 9 years

    “Koliko sakora!” some of her friends teased her as she opened her food bowl. Dzifa had eaten fried potatoes with hot pepper for lunch for the past four days. Not that she did not like the food. She did but there was no fish to eat the meal with. She had no other option, but to eat the food, just as it was.

    Soon, break was over and lessons resumed.

    “What is that in your dress?” Miss Lucy enquired.

    “Please teacher, it is red hot pepper” Dzifa replied.

    The whole class burst into laughter.

    Dzifa resolved that after such an embarrassment before the whole class, she was not going to help Miss Lucy with clean the classroom anymore.

    Read further to see what happened later and the surprise that lay in store for Dzifa.

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    Red Hot Pepper

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  • Hot

    Those Who Live in Glasshouses Should Not Throw Stones

    Age Range: 8 – 12 years

    Zinabu and six other dancers put up a splendid performance at the durbar grounds. Their dancing is so impressive that they are asked to perform again the next day. Amina is keen on being the lead dancer this time round, and so accuses Zinabu of missing her steps during the previous performance. She succeeds in convincing Madam Aisha, the drama and dance teacher that she can put up a better performance.

    It turns out that the next day, she messes up and the crowds are not impressed.

    Why would she criticize Zinabu, when she herself cannot dance?

    Indeed, those who live in glass houses should not throw stones.

    The stories in this series Idioms in Expression aim at giving children a better understanding of idiomatic expressions. Since these idioms form the main theme for the story, it becomes easy for the reader to understand the contexts within which such expressions should be used.

    Coupled with this learning experience are the exciting story lines which do not only portray the familiar African culture, but also provide a wide vocabulary for readers’ use.

    12.00

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