• 1947 – 1957: The Story of Ghana’s Independence (Pre-order)

    *Not yet in print, awaiting launch

    Ghana, a former colony of Great Britain, made history on March 6, 1957, when it became the first country in Sub-Saharan Africa to gain its independence. There have been many accounts of the story of Ghana’s independence by scholars, protagonists and observers alike. In this book, the author revisits the story and in a year by year account from 1947 to 1957 when the first Prime Minister, Kwame Nkrumah, declared Ghana’s independence, highlighting some of the key events that drove the struggle.

    The book also examines in detail the role played by individuals whose names have come to be associated with the struggle as an attempt to settle the old question of individuals in political change with Ghana as the case study.

    It is written with the perspective of a journalist and historian.

  • 60 Days of Power

    The book begins with a more detailed autobiography of his boyhood by the amiable PZ himself and continues with reflections by contributors on how the Late PZ Aginighan touched their lives. What better way to pay tribute! Each story from the different contributors exposes us to timeless biblical truths, scriptural references, and leadership lessons. As such, the book can be read as a devotional or as anecdotes of the inspirational life of the Odudu of Africa, Late PZ Aginighan.

    The stories were compiled by Dubamo Aginighan, his youngest son and author of Grace Vision and Unity; A Corper’s Story.

  • A Fighting Chance

    An unlikely political star tells the inspiring story of the two-decade journey that taught her how Washington really works—and really doesn’t—in A Fighting Chance

    As a child in small-town Oklahoma, Elizabeth Warren yearned to go to college and then become an elementary school teacher—an ambitious goal, given her family’s modest means. Early marriage and motherhood seemed to put even that dream out of reach, but fifteen years later she was a distinguished law professor with a deep understanding of why people go bankrupt. Then came the phone call that changed her life: could she come to Washington DC to help advise Congress on rewriting the bankruptcy laws?

    Thus began an impolite education into the bare-knuckled, often dysfunctional ways of Washington. She fought for better bankruptcy laws for ten years and lost. She tried to hold the federal government accountable during the financial crisis but became a target of the big banks. She came up with the idea for a new agency designed to protect consumers from predatory bankers and was denied the opportunity to run it. Finally, at age 62, she decided to run for elective office and won the most competitive—and watched—Senate race in the country.

    In this passionate, funny, rabble-rousing book, Warren shows why she has chosen to fight tooth and nail for the middle class—and why she has become a hero to all those who believe that America’s government can and must do better for working families.

  • A Giant Tree Has Fallen – Tributes to Ali Mazrui (Pre-order)

    **Available mid February 2019**

    This book memorializing the life and work of Ali Al’amin Mazrui comprises more than 130 tributes written by people ranging from heads of state to journalists.Out of respect for Mazrui’s immediate family members, their tributes are presented first, followed by those from his global family members.

    Included in the book are three chapters that comprise an introductory essay, a brief biography of Mazrui, and an essay on metaphorical-linguistic analysis of the tributes. The book also has a preface by the co-editors and a foreword by Salim Ahmed Salim, the former prime Minister of the United Republic of Tanzania and former Secretary-General of the Organization of African Unity (OAU), now known as the African Union. Dr Salim, who served as the Secretary- General of the OAU from 1989 to 2001, was Mazrui’s friend and contemporary. Mazrui once described Salim as ‘Mr. Africa’ and the ‘first real post-colonial Secretary-General of the OAU.’

     

  • Are You Not A Nigerian? Thoughts on a Nation at Crossroads

    *Available from 15th September 2019.

    Are You Not A Nigerian? chronicles a country’s fourth attempt at democratic governance after many years of military dictatorship. Through his personal experiences and observations, Báyọ̀ Olúpohùndà captures the reality of Nigeria’s socio-political environment at the turn of the millennium, the collapse of dignity in service, and the ubiquitous “Nigerian factor” that creates entitlement.

    Are You Not A Nigerian? examines the lost opportunities, the disappointment of successive administrations, and the dilemma of a nation at a crossroads.

  • Axioms of Dr. K. A. Busia: A Compilation of Philosophies, Ideas and Policies of a Statesman

    This book reflects the thoughts of K. A. Busia, Ghana’s first university professor and prime minister of the 2nd Republic. It consists of extracts from his writings as a scholar, politician and statesman.

    The book deals with issues regarding democracy, the rule of law, good governance, our common humanity, knowledge and
    education, among others.

    It is a requisite companion for academics, politicians, the clergy, traditional rulers, historians, researchers, students and all those who subscribe to the tenets of democracy.

  • Bridging Civil-Military Gap: Strategies for Robust Relationships and Successful Operations

    In this timely and relevant book, Flight Lieutenant Anthonia Egbujiobi presents facts and figures from her detailed research on curbing insecurity and calls for co-operation between the military and civilians as the way to combating insecurity. The book also suggests how this collaboration can and should be achieved.
    She was inspired to author this book when she was nominated by the United Nations to serve in Congo as a military observer. Her experiences about the programmes and empowerment schemes she conducted in Congo – which earned her a recognition and award by the UN and Nigerian Air Force – with the peoples and communities where she served are documented in her first book titled, Building Castles With Pebbles.

  • Building Castles With Pebbles

    In this book, the author prescribes attitudes to adopt and live by should one wish to make a headway despite one’s circumstances. She also shares anecdotes of her personal experiences to assert that these are not just mere hypotheses, but tried-and-trusted principles.

    Building Castles with Pebbles is a breath of fresh air. It is both good news (for a change) and a message of hope.

  • Che Guevara Reader: Writings on Politics and Revolution

    Recognized as one of Time Magazine’s ‘icons of the 20th century, Che Guevara became a legend in his own time and now has re-emerged as a symbol of a new generation of political activists. Far more than a guerrilla strategist, Che Guevara made a profound and lasting contribution to revolutionary theory and Marxist humanism as demonstrated in this best selling Reader.

     

  • Death and Pain: Rawlings’ Ghana – The Inside Story

    “On 30 December 1981, the Ghana Armed Forces held a party at the Ministry of Defence at Burma Camp. The President, Dr. Hilla Limann, had been invited, but because of the security situation in the country he was advised not to attend. Around 3 p.m. the President changed his mind and decided to attend the party. It was not until around midnight that he returned to his official residence at the Castle.

    “Around this time, 10 soldiers, some retired, all other ranks, gathered some two miles to the south of the Camp waiting for grenades and other ammunition from their accomplices at the First Infantry Battalion at Michel Camp, about 20 miles to the East of their position. They never turned up. At about 2 a.m. on 31 December 1981, the small group decided to move. Their objective: to seize the country and form a new government.

    “Leaving the Labadi beach in the neighbourhood of the Teshie Military Range, the handful of coupmakers moved through the bush to the Recce Cookhouse. Among them were C.C. Addae, Matthew Adabuga, Gbofah, Braimah, Alidu Gyiwah, Sammy Amedeka and Allieu. Jerry Rawlings was already in Burma Camp hiding in the room of Adabuga at the Gondar Barracks…”

    Do you want a first-hand account from the murderers of the 3 judges and officer whilst they were in Nsawam Prison waiting to be executed by firing squad? Do you want to see the list of Ghanaians who went ‘missing’ during the Revolution? A relevant piece of Ghana history is in this book.

     

  • Digital Democracy, Analogue Politics: How the Internet Era is Transforming Kenya

    From the upheavals of recent national elections to the success of the #MyDressMyChoice feminist movement, digital platforms have already had a dramatic impact on political life in Kenya – one of the most electronically advanced countries in Africa. While the impact of the Digital Age on Western politics has been extensively debated, there is still little appreciation of how it has been felt in developing countries such as Kenya, where Twitter, Facebook, WhatsApp and other online platforms are increasingly a part of everyday life.

    Written by a respected Kenyan activist and researcher at the forefront of political online struggles, this book presents a unique contribution to the debate on digital democracy. For traditionally marginalised groups, particularly women and people with disabilities, digital spaces have allowed Kenyans to build new communities which transcend old ethnic and gender divisions. But the picture is far from wholly positive.

    Digital Democracy, Analogue Politics explores the drastic efforts being made by elites to contain online activism, as well as how ‘fake news’, a failed digital vote-counting system and the incumbent president’s recruitment of Cambridge Analytica contributed to tensions around the 2017 elections. Reframing digital democracy from the African perspective, Nyabola’s ground-breaking work opens up new ways of understanding our current global online era.

  • Dreams From My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance

    Before Barack Obama became a politician, he was, among other things, a writer. Dreams from My Father is a masterpiece: a refreshing, revealing portrait of a young man asking the big questions about identity and belonging.

    The son of a black African father and a white American mother, President Obama recounts an emotional odyssey, retracing the migration of his mother’s family from Kansas to Hawaii, then to his childhood home in Indonesia. Finally he travels to Kenya, where he confronts the bitter truth of his father’s life and at last reconciles his divided inheritance.

    Written at the age of thirty-three, Dreams from My Father is an unforgettable read. It illuminates not only Obama’s journey, but also our universal desire to understand our history, and what makes us the people we are.

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