• A Bad Day for Martha

    Age Range: 8 – 10 years

    In this short book, young readers explore the importance of integrity and the repercussions for acting immorally.

     

  • A Children’s Island

    Age Range: 8 – 15 years

    An adventurous early reader from Adaex in morals and character development for children, A Children’s Island teaches young readers about law enforcement and the importance of laws.
  • A Dream I Had

    Age Range: 6 – 10 years

    Samira wakes up one morning to find an empty house. Where is everyone? She wonders.

    Where have they all gone? How would she get to school early enough to write her exams?

    There comes her transport: a beautiful horse and its rider.

    Find out how she gets to school and all that ensues thereafter.

     

    A Dream I Had

    12.00
  • A Flogging at Sea

    Age Range: 8 – 10 years

    This early reader from Adaex enlightens young readers about how a democratic country functions and how it can be beneficial for the society.

  • A Football Match

    Age Range: 8 – 10 years

    This early reader from Adaex focuses on character development with a story about taking responsibility for your own actions.Football can unite people but it can also be nasty if players and supporters are not courteous and do not see it as a unifying game.

  • A Friend In Need Is A Friend Indeed

    Age Range: 10 – 13 years

    Fiifi and his two friends, Kakra and Panyin are neighbours. In an Art and Craft class, Fiifi cannot mold his clay pot. He asks Panyin to help him complete his art work over the weekend, but Panyin gives a thousand and one reasons why he cannot help.

    With Kakra’s guide, Fiifi is able to mold a beautiful pot. This pot turns out to be the best among the lot. Fiifi is pleased with himself and thankful to Kakra who helped him. Mr. Kumah awards him the highest marks.

    Where is Panyin? He cannot share in Fiifi’s joy because he did not help when he was needed most. He sits under the tree all by himself, and away from the fun and cheers.

    Fiifi now knows who can indeed be called a friend.

    The stories in this series Idioms in Expression aim at giving children a better understanding of idiomatic expressions. Since these idioms form the main theme for the story, it becomes easy for the reader to understand the contexts within which such expressions should be used.

    Coupled with this learning experience are the exciting story lines which do not only portray the familiar African culture, but also provide a wide vocabulary for readers’ use.

  • A Monster at Midnight

    Age Range: 8+ years

    Phila is not happy that has to spend her holidays in her grandma’s village. It’s too far from her best friends and she is trapped with her annoying brother and sister.

    When she hears the story of Bro. E, a strange tale the young children of the village tell to scare and taunt, she has no idea about the thrilling adventure ahead.

    A monster is coming at midnight, RUN, PHILA, RUN!

     

  • Abaka’s Story

    Age Range: 8 – 10 years

    This early reader from Adaex shows young readers how their discourteous habits may cause other individuals pain and may create bad impressions.

    Abaka’s Story shows young readers how their discourteous habits may cause other individuals pain and may create bad impressions.

    Abaka’s Story

    10.00
  • Africa (A True Book: The Seven Continents)

    Age Range: 8 – 10 years

    Africa is often called the Cradle of Humankind. Millions of years ago, it was home to the very first humans, and today it remains a vibrant land filled with diverse cultures. Readers will tour Africa’s varied landscape and get a close look at its many iconic plants and animals. They will also learn about the continent’s history and discover how its people live today. Features include engaging sidebars that highlight unique animals, landmarks and more; maps to show size, location and topography; glossaries; eye-catching images; charts, diagrams and more.

  • African Dance in Ghana: Contemporary Transformations

    In African Dance in Ghana: Contemporary Transformations, Professor Francis Nii-Yartey tells the story of the development of dance – both traditional and contemporary – since Ghana’s independence. The book charts the people and events that influenced new forms of dance and their impact on art, culture and national identity. The dances that emerge combine centuries-old tradition with a yearning for original expression and innovation.

    Nii-Yartey is uniquely equipped to tell the story, having been directly involved through his directorship of the Department of Dance at the University of Ghana and his involvement in establishing the Ghana Dance Ensemble and the Noyam African Dance Institute.

    The second part of the book gives detailed choreographic instructions for 18 dance pieces, most of which were written, choreographed and directed by the author. They form an invaluable legacy to his career.

  • Aleke Mahe Vinyee? (Ewe)

    Aleke Mahe Vinyee? (How Do I Train My Child?) deals with the various aspects of child education and training.

  • An Orchestra of Minorities

    The “superb and tragic” Booker Prize finalist about a Nigerian poultry farmer who sacrifices everything to win the woman he loves, by the author of The Fishermen (Boston Globe)
    Set on the outskirts of Umuahia, Nigeria and narrated by a chi, or guardian spirit, AN ORCHESTRA OF MINORITIES tells the story of Chinonso, a young poultry farmer whose soul is ignited when he sees a woman attempting to jump from a highway bridge. Horrified by her recklessness, Chinonso joins her on the roadside and hurls two of his prized chickens into the water below to express the severity of such a fall. The woman, Ndali, is stopped her in her tracks.

    Bonded by this night on the bridge, Chinonso and Ndali fall in love. But Ndali is from a wealthy family and struggles to imagine a future near a chicken coop. When her family objects to the union because he is uneducated, Chinonso sells most of his possessions to attend a college in Cyprus. But when he arrives he discovers there is no place at the school for him, and that he has been utterly duped by the young Nigerian who has made the arrangements.. Penniless, homeless, and furious at a world which continues to relegate him to the sidelines, Chinonso gets further away from his dream, from Ndali and the farm he called home.

    Spanning continents, traversing the earth and cosmic spaces, and told by a narrator who has lived for hundreds of years, the novel is a contemporary twist of Homer’s Odyssey. Written in the mythic style of the Igbo literary tradition, Chigozie Obioma weaves a heart-wrenching epic about destiny and determination.

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