• The Trial of J.J. Rawlings: Echoes of the 31st December Revolution (2nd Edition)

    The Trial of JJ Rawlings narrates the extraordinary circumstances under which a young military officer Flt Lt JJ Rawlings, later to become the longest serving Head of State of Ghana, shot into the limelight to change the course of Ghana’s history and political development.The first edition of the book, originally published in 1986, completely sold out within a year, making this second edition very welcome in response to public request.

    This volume is a valuable contribution to our understanding of those ineluctable forces that have changed the contours of our society. Surely, the story of JJ, well told in this volume, cannot fail to grip and hold the reader’s most concentrated attention. – Prof F.A. Botchwey, PhD

  • Changes (African Writers Series)

    Changes is a spirited and poignant story about Esi, an independent woman who leaves her husband, Oko, because he intrudes on her time and personal space.

    Confronted with the difficulty of finding love and companionship on acceptable terms, Esi meets Ali and falls in love, but she must decide if she is willing to make the changes necessary for a relationship.

    In Changes, the renowned Ghanaian writer, Ama Ata Aidoo, addresses various issues in contemporary African women’s lives: love, career, betrayal and family, without offering simple solutions.

  • Who Told the Most Incredible Story: Vol 3 – The Singing Competition and Other Stories

    54 folktales in five volumes are in the series and are all illustrated in colour.

    These amazing tales will preoccupy both children and adult minds, anywhere. The stories are simple, visualising the world through narration. They provide deep insights into human life, with emphasis on the essence of African lifestyle and ways of understanding. Among others, they hold a mirror for readers all over the world to see who we were and who we can become, while thinking of who we are.

    Drawn from the oral tradition these tales will appeal to both children and adults everywhere. This delightful collection, the result of years of field research work that partly informed courses the author taught in African and Oral Literature, shapes her first creative writing project.

    Written in straightforward and engaging language, the author weaves the stones out of the cultural fabric woven by the ancestors with authenticity. To make it easy rooting for readers across ages, these remarkable narratives are beautifully and colourfully illustrated, adding an intricate layer to the material.

    “Each tale entertains and creates a context for creative and innovative learning. The collection is therefore highly recommended for enjoyment and study by everyone – thinkers, political scientists, writers, theologians, sociologists and anyone who appreciates the African way of life”. – Dr. K. B. Maison (Nana Kobena Nketsia V)

  • The Lion’s Whisper

    2018 CODE Burt Award for African Young Adult Literature Finalist

    Leo and David, both fifteen years old, are neighbours who are divided by more than just a wall. When David unexpectedly reaches out to him, Leo hesitantly accepts and David soon becomes a secret brother, helping Leo overcome a paralysing fear from his past.

    Leo embarks with David on a mission to root out the answer to a mystery that has tormented David for years. Their friendship is tested beyond the wire as bitterness and betrayal pitch their families, and ultimately the boys themselves, against each other.

    Then a bloody military coup rips Leo’s world apart and he has to find courage he never had before and an ally. But after all the years of bitterness, can Leo afford to forgive and trust his family’s enemy?

  • The Legend: Kwame Nkrumah

    Age Range: 8 – 12 years

    Kwame Nkrumah was Ghana’s first prime minister and first president. He led the country to independence in 1957 and achieved a lot for his people. He also championed the struggle for Africa’s independence, working hard to unite the continent. He remains one of the most outstanding and respected leaders in Africa.

    Nkrumah was voted Africa’s Man of he Millennium by BBC listeners in 2000.

  • Bukom

    A classic.

    The wind of change had been blowing across the earth’s surface for centuries before someone made headlines with the phrase. This wind had been affecting nations, peoples, their attitudes and their ways of thinking; sometimes for the worse, and sometimes, for the better. Perhaps, one might justifiably say that this explains why the human race tends to be caught with its pants down in the matter of development; sometimes very positive, but all too often, far too negative. In every city, there is one area which remains defiantly and stubbornly averse to change or development. One such area in the municipality of Accra is James Town, with Bukom as its centre – the epitome of the black neighbourhood of the old order. Meet Ataa Kojo, who is satisfied to have won a gold tiepin for “twenty-five years of loyal service” to a European trading firm, and his family. At his age, he has not done badly at all. He would be completely satisfied with a modern toilet in his home, but the City Council says he needs a permit to “undertake construction works”…

    BUKOM was the first novel by Bill Marshall. This novel won the Ghana National Book Award for the young writer in 1979. Over the decades, his writings have been wide and diverse spanning film and television, radio, the press and books. Among his published books are Novels: Brother Man, The Oyster Man, Uncle Blanko’s Chair; Plays: Shadows of an Eagle, Stranger to Innocence, Son of Umbele, The Crows and Other Plays, Asana.

    Bukom

    12.00
  • Who Told the Most Incredible Story: Vol 4 – The Spread of Wisdom and Other Stories

    54 folktales in five volumes are in the series and are all illustrated in colour.

    These amazing tales will preoccupy both children and adult minds, anywhere. The stories are simple, visualising the world through narration. They provide deep insights into human life, with emphasis on the essence of African lifestyle and ways of understanding. Among others, they hold a mirror for readers all over the world to see who we were and who we can become, while thinking of who we are.

    Drawn from the oral tradition these tales will appeal to both children and adults everywhere. This delightful collection, the result of years of field research work that partly informed courses the author taught in African and Oral Literature, shapes her first creative writing project.

    Written in straightforward and engaging language, the author weaves the stones out of the cultural fabric woven by the ancestors with authenticity. To make it easy rooting for readers across ages, these remarkable narratives are beautifully and colourfully illustrated, adding an intricate layer to the material.

    “Each tale entertains and creates a context for creative and innovative learning. The collection is therefore highly recommended for enjoyment and study by everyone – thinkers, political scientists, writers, theologians, sociologists and anyone who appreciates the African way of life”. – Dr. K. B. Maison (Nana Kobena Nketsia V)

  • Voice in the Forest

    “Dr. Efua Sutherland has once again rescued a couple of folktale mores from our oral traditions and brilliantly merged and polished them into a truly wondrous gem of a tale for young people, as well as the young at heart. This new and dynamic rendering makes some ancient world wisdom accessible to today’s children.” Ama Ata Aidoo, 2006

    Voice in the Forest draws upon the traditional fairy tales and folktales of Ghana. Unlike most traditional tales which seek to explain one thing, this story explains several things and practices; the mandatory rest day for farmers, the founding of a village and why calling children bad names is wrong. It’s ambitious. And yet it captures and holds a child’s attention so completely.

    The illustrations, by Ralph Sutherland, are just stunning. Stunning.

    Voice in the Forest is a fantastic story.

  • The Amazing Adventures of Auntie Ashanti

    Age Range: 7 – 10 years

    Join Auntie Ashanti as she discovers the wonders of Ghana with some surprising new friends!

  • Queen of the Night and Other Stories

    Age Range: 8 – 12 years

    A carefully-thought out and intriguing collection of short stories with the aim to capture traditional beliefs which are relevant to diverse cultures.

  • The Joys of Motherhood

    The fourth novel from the Nigerian-born writer, Buchi Emecheta, The Joys of Motherhood is recognised as one of Africa’s 100 Best Books of the 20th Century in an initiative organised by the Zimbabwean International Book Fair.

    First published in 1979, The Joys of Motherhood is the story of Nnu Ego, a Nigerian woman struggling in a patriarchal society. Unable to conceive in her first marriage, Nnu is banished to Lagos where she succeeds in becoming a mother. Then, against the backdrop of World War II, Nnu must fiercely protect herself and her children when she is abandoned by her husband and her people.

    The Joys of Motherhood is a powerful commentary on polygamy, patriarchy and women’s changing roles in urban Nigeria.

  • A is for Ampe: An Alphabet Book from Ghana

    Age Range: 2 – 5 years

    Pre-school – Grade 1

    A is for Ampe: An Alphabet Book from Ghana is a must-add book for youngsters’ home libraries as well as a must-purchase by day cares, kindergartens, early years classrooms and the children’s section of public libraries.

    In this well-designed alphabet book, the entire alphabet, in upper case, runs across the top of each page which has the focused-upon letter being presented in bolded, larger print. At the bottom of the page, the upper case letter appears in one corner and the lower case in the other. In between is the very brief text which follows a simple, standard pattern, eg. “D is for drum” or “T is for twins.” The objects used to represent the letters can be found in Hildebrand’s and Knowles’ full colour photos which occupy most of each page. Children will encounter the familiar, such as “E is for eggs” and “U is for umbrella,” but, as the short title indicates, they will also meet many new words. Hopefully, those adults who will be sharing this book with pre-readers will have, themselves, first read the book so that they will have discovered at the book’s conclusion the “Glossary of Ghanaian Words” in which Knowles, in addition to providing, where needed, a pronunciation guide, has explained eight Ghanaian terms, including the title’s “Ampe [AHM-pay]: A challenging game, usually played by girls, which involves jumping and clapping. The leading player tries to beat her opponent by the tactical placement of her left or right foot.”

Main Menu