• 21 Lessons for the 21st Century

    #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • In Sapiens, he explored our past. In Homo Deus, he looked to our future. Now, one of the most innovative thinkers on the planet turns to the present to make sense of today’s most pressing issues.

    “Fascinating . . . a crucial global conversation about how to take on the problems of the twenty-first century.”—Bill Gates, The New York Times Book Review

    NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY FINANCIAL TIMES AND PAMELA PAUL, KQED 

    How do computers and robots change the meaning of being human? How do we deal with the epidemic of fake news? Are nations and religions still relevant? What should we teach our children?

    Yuval Noah Harari’s 21 Lessons for the 21st Century is a probing and visionary investigation into today’s most urgent issues as we move into the uncharted territory of the future. As technology advances faster than our understanding of it, hacking becomes a tactic of war, and the world feels more polarized than ever, Harari addresses the challenge of navigating life in the face of constant and disorienting change and raises the important questions we need to ask ourselves in order to survive.

    In twenty-one accessible chapters that are both provocative and profound, Harari builds on the ideas explored in his previous books, untangling political, technological, social, and existential issues and offering advice on how to prepare for a very different future from the world we now live in: How can we retain freedom of choice when Big Data is watching us? What will the future workforce look like, and how should we ready ourselves for it? How should we deal with the threat of terrorism? Why is liberal democracy in crisis?

    Harari’s unique ability to make sense of where we have come from and where we are going has captured the imaginations of millions of readers. Here he invites us to consider values, meaning, and personal engagement in a world full of noise and uncertainty. When we are deluged with irrelevant information, clarity is power. Presenting complex contemporary challenges clearly and accessibly, 21 Lessons for the 21st Century is essential reading.

    “If there were such a thing as a required instruction manual for politicians and thought leaders, Israeli historian Yuval Noah Harari’s 21 Lessons for the 21st Century would deserve serious consideration. In this collection of provocative essays, Harari . . . tackles a daunting array of issues, endeavoring to answer a persistent question: ‘What is happening in the world today, and what is the deep meaning of these events?’”—BookPage (top pick)

    75.00
  • A Bad Day for Martha

    Age Range: 8 – 10 years

    In this short book, young readers explore the importance of integrity and the repercussions for acting immorally.

     

    10.00
  • A Children’s Island

    Age Range: 8 – 15 years

    An adventurous early reader from Adaex in morals and character development for children, A Children’s Island teaches young readers about law enforcement and the importance of laws.
    10.00
  • A Danish Jew in West Africa: Wulff Joseph Wulff Biography And Letters (1836-1842)

    Wulff’s life history is of considerable interest in itself. In her biographical essay (Part I) Selena Axelrod Winsnes portrays him as a ‘marginal man’: being a Jew in Denmark at the beginning of the 19th century was to some extent an uphill struggle for those who sought public recognition, and Wulff did not escape discrimination in his administrative career at Christiansborg either, although special circumstances allowed him to hold important positions, and yet, only for the short term.

    Paradoxically, on his arrival to the Gold Coast Wulff — as a Jew — was placed in a middle position in the racial hierarchy dominating the mind-set of his superiors in Copenhagen — between Africans and Europeans. In many respects he shared the fate of Euro-Africans, straddling two worlds and being ‘sealed off’ from the top echelons of the European establishments on the Coast.

    This book comprises two parts. The first is a biographical presentation of Wulff Joseph Wulff , a Danish Jew. It is an essay concerning the last six years of his life, spent on the Gold Coast of West Africa, based on letters he wrote to his family in Denmark. Those letters were published in 1917 as Da Guinea var Dansk [When Guinea was Danish], by Carl Behrens, a member of his family in Denmark. The second part of the book is an edited translation of the letters from Danish into English.

    40.00
  • Hot

    A Dream I Had

    Age Range: 6 – 10 years

    Samira wakes up one morning to find an empty house. Where is everyone? She wonders.

    Where have they all gone? How would she get to school early enough to write her exams?

    There comes her transport: a beautiful horse and its rider.

    Find out how she gets to school and all that ensues thereafter.

     

    12.00

    A Dream I Had

    12.00
  • A Flogging at Sea

    Age Range: 8 – 10 years

    This early reader from Adaex enlightens young readers about how a democratic country functions and how it can be beneficial for the society.

    10.00
  • A Football Match

    Age Range: 8 – 10 years

    This early reader from Adaex focuses on character development with a story about taking responsibility for your own actions.Football can unite people but it can also be nasty if players and supporters are not courteous and do not see it as a unifying game.

    10.00
  • Hot

    A Friend In Need Is A Friend Indeed

    Age Range: 10 – 13 years

    Fiifi and his two friends, Kakra and Panyin are neighbours. In an Art and Craft class, Fiifi cannot mold his clay pot. He asks Panyin to help him complete his art work over the weekend, but Panyin gives a thousand and one reasons why he cannot help.

    With Kakra’s guide, Fiifi is able to mold a beautiful pot. This pot turns out to be the best among the lot. Fiifi is pleased with himself and thankful to Kakra who helped him. Mr. Kumah awards him the highest marks.

    Where is Panyin? He cannot share in Fiifi’s joy because he did not help when he was needed most. He sits under the tree all by himself, and away from the fun and cheers.

    Fiifi now knows who can indeed be called a friend.

    The stories in this series Idioms in Expression aim at giving children a better understanding of idiomatic expressions. Since these idioms form the main theme for the story, it becomes easy for the reader to understand the contexts within which such expressions should be used.

    Coupled with this learning experience are the exciting story lines which do not only portray the familiar African culture, but also provide a wide vocabulary for readers’ use.

    15.00
  • A History of Indigenous Slavery in Ghana: From the 15th to the 19th Century

    Academic research and publication on indigenous slavery in Ghana and in Africa more widely have not received attention commensurate with the importance of the phenomenon: the history of indigenous slavery, which existed long before the trans-Atlantic slave trade, has been a marginal topic in documented historical studies on Ghana. Yet its weighty historical, and contemporary relevance inside and outside Africa is undisputed.
    This book begins to redress this neglect. Drawing on sources including oral data from so-called slave descendants, cultural sites and trade routes, court records and colonial government reports, it presents historical and cultural analysis which aims to enhance historical knowledge and understanding of indigenous slavery. The author further intends to provide a holistic view of the indigenous institution of slavery as a formative factor in the social, political and economic development of pre- colonial Ghana.
    50.00
  • Out Of Stock

    A is for Africa

    Age Range: 2 – 5 years

    From A to Z, stunning color photographs depict everyday life in Nigeria, where the author-photographer grew up—but the images pictured also represent the rich diversity of Africa, and the warm family ties and traditional village life found throughout this vast colorful continent.

    “A talented photographer, Onyefulu [offers] and incisive, sophisticated view of her homeland’s rich heritage.”—Publishers Weekly

    “Visually appealing.”—Kirkus Reviews

     

    15.00

    A is for Africa

    15.00
  • A Medal for Nickie

    Age Range: 4+ years

    Grandad was very old. Nickie thought he must be at least a hundred. Grandad had many stories to tell.

    One day Nickie asked him about his shiny medal. It was shaped like a cross with a ribbon on it.

    “I got this for bravery,” said Grandad. “Let me tell you about it.”

    Find out the story behind the medal and why Nickie earned it from Grandad.

    10.00
  • A Monster at Midnight

    Age Range: 8+ years

    Phila is not happy that has to spend her holidays in her grandma’s village. It’s too far from her best friends and she is trapped with her annoying brother and sister.

    When she hears the story of Bro. E, a strange tale the young children of the village tell to scare and taunt, she has no idea about the thrilling adventure ahead.

    A monster is coming at midnight, RUN, PHILA, RUN!

     

    22.00

Main Menu