• A Cowrie of Hope (African Writers Series)

    “These were the nineties,” reflects the narrator of A Cowrie of Hope, and for the young widow Nasula they are years of relentless economic hardship and privation. She dreams of a better life for her beautiful daughter, Sula, free from poverty and independent of marriage. But when Nasula finds herself unable to pay for Sula’s education, her hopes seem to have been extinguished – until a friend advised her to go to Lusaka and sell her last sack of highly sought-after Mbala beans. Nasula makes the journey, but in the city she finds herself exposed to new, and predatory, dangers.

    In A Cowrie of Hope Binwell Sinyangwe captures the rhythms of a people whose poverty has not diminished their dignity, where hope can only be accompanied by small acts of courage, and where friendship has not lost its value.

    30.00
  • A Duty of Memory (African Writers Series)

    This is the story of an Afrikaner-English brother and sister separated as children and the consequences of their violent background. Eben was raised on the family farm and Jo was sent to live in England. While Eben becomes a member of a clandestine hit-squad that perpetrates violence against blacks, homosexuals, and Communists, Jo lives and unsettled life, frequently changing jobs and lovers. After Eben’s death, Jo returns to the family farm to find out the truth of what has happened to her family.

    In this gripping and honest story Botha examines violence within the family as well as the country. It is particularly appropriate in the current South African climate of learning about the past and coming to terms with the truth.

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  • A Farewell to Arms

    In 1918 Ernest Hemingway went to war, to the war to end all wars. He volunteered for ambulance service in Italy, was wounded, and twice decorated. Out of his experiences came A Farewell to Arms. Hemingway’s description of war is unforgettable. He recreates the fear, the comradeship, the courage of his young American volunteer, and the men and women he meets in Italy with total conviction.

    The best American novel to emerge from World War I, A Farewell to Arms is the unforgettable story of an American ambulance driver on the Italian front and his passion for a beautiful English nurse. Hemingway’s frank portrayal of the love between Lieutenant Henry and Catherine Barkley, caught in the inexorable sweep of war, glows with an intensity unrivaled in modern literature, while his description of the German attack on Caporetto — of lines of fired men marching in the rain, hungry, weary, and demoralized — is one of the greatest moments in literary history.

    A story of love and pain, of loyalty and desertion, A Farewell to Arms, written when he was 30 years old, represents a new romanticism for Hemingway. A Farewell to Arms is not only a novel of war. In it, Hemingway has also created a love story of immense drama and uncompromising passion.

    50.00
  • A Grain of Wheat (African Writers Series)

    Barack Obama, via Facebook: “A compelling story of how the transformative events of history weigh on individual lives and relationships.”

    The Nobel Prize–nominated Kenyan writer’s best-known novel

    Set in the wake of the Mau Mau rebellion and on the cusp of Kenya’s independence from Britain, A Grain of Wheat follows a group of villagers whose lives have been transformed by the 1952–1960 Emergency. At the center of it all is the reticent Mugo, the village’s chosen hero and a man haunted by a terrible secret. As we learn of the villagers’ tangled histories in a narrative interwoven with myth and peppered with allusions to real-life leaders, including Jomo Kenyatta, a masterly story unfolds in which compromises are forced, friendships are betrayed, and loves are tested.

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  • A Husband for Esi Ellua

    Dramatic and Haunting…this is the story of the consuming bravery of a man over whose love for a woman falls the shadow of imminent disaster.

    It is set in the Second World War in shattered Gold Coast (now Ghana) where husbands torn from their wives and children found themselves in places undreamt of only a few months before. Amid the gaiety and clatter of Army life, the man and woman play out dramas with perilous intensity to the final moment of disaster.

    Filled with brilliance and fascination.

    25.00
  • A Man of the People (African Writers Series)

    As Minister for Culture, the Honourable M. A. Nanga is ‘a man of the people’, as cynical as he is charming, and a roguish opportunist. At first, the contrast between Nanga and Odili, a former pupil who is visiting the ministry, appears huge. But in the ‘eat-and-let-eat’ atmosphere, Odili’s idealism soon collides with his lusts – and the two men’s personal and political tauntings threaten to send their country into chaos. Published, prophetically, just days before Nigeria’s first attempted coup in 1966, A Man of the People is an essential part of his body of work dealing with modern African history.

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  • A Question of Power (African Writers Series)

    “Your mother was insane. If you’re not careful you’ll get insane just like your mother. Your mother was a white woman. They had to lock her up, as she was having a child by the stable boy who was a native.”

    It is never clear to Elizabeth whether the mission school principal’s cruel revelation of her origins is at the bottom of her mental breakdown. She has left South Africa with her son and is living in the village of Motabeng, the place of sand, in Botswana where there are no street lights at night. In the darkness of this country where people turn and look at her with vague curiosity as an outsider she establishes an entirely abnormal relationship with two men. A mind-bending book which takes the reader in and out of sanity.

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  • A Squatter’s Tale (African Writers Series)

    Young financier Obi enjoys life in the fast lane in 1990’s Lagos. He walks tall in designer suits with his girlfriend at his side enjoying the envy of those with empty purses.

    When his finance company collapses Obi’s decadent lifestyle comes to an abrupt end and he is forced to flee to the United States. There he has to live on the margins of society. Obi wants money, he wants a woman, and he wants to live the good life.

    This face-paced novel, by turns comic and moving, reveals what success and failure mean for the young Nigerian at home and in exile. Ike Oguine explores the alienation experienced by today’s economic refugees under the cover of light-hearted comedy.

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  • A Woman Alone: Autobiographical Writings (African Writers Series)

    Intense personal experiences of South Africa’s brutal social system, a sense of stifled creativity and a distaste for politics made Bessie Head leave for Botswana on an exit permit at the age of 27. There, in her chosen rural ‘haven’ of Serowe, and despite a severe mental breakdown, she wrote the novels and stories that earned her international recognition as one of Africa’s most remarkable and individual writers.

    A Woman Alone is a collection of autobiographical writings, sketches, and essays that covers the entire span of Bessie Head’s creative life, up to her death in 1986 at the age of 49. It reveals a woman of great sensitivity and vitality, inspired through her knowledge of suffering with “a reverence for ordinary people” and finding some healing for her own anguish in a quiet corner of Africa.

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  • A Woman in Her Prime

    A young woman makes that all-important rite of passage from adolescence to adulthood. However, her early adult life is marred by childlessness in a society that places a great premium on children and motherhood as the ultimate mark of womanhood.
    25.00
  • Aladdin (Ladybird Readers Series Level 4 )

    Age Range: 5 – 8  years

    A magician sent Aladdin down into a well to find a magic lamp. Then, the magician moved a stone over the well. Aladdin was caught inside!

    Ladybird Readers is a graded reading series of traditional tales, popular characters, modern stories, and non-fiction, written for young learners of English as a foreign or second language.

    Beautifully illustrated and carefully written, the series combines the best of Ladybird content with the structured language progression that will help children develop their reading, writing, speaking, listening and critical thinking skills.

    The six levels of Readers and Activity Books follow the CEFR framework and include language activities that provide

     

    15.00
  • Anansi Helps a Friend (Ladybird Readers Series Level 1)

    Age Range: 5 – 8  years

    Anansi’s children are not happy. Monkey and Rat’s children do not want to play. But one day, Anansi and his children help Snake.

    Ladybird Readers is a graded reading series of traditional tales, popular characters, modern stories, and non-fiction, written for young learners of English as a foreign or second language.

    Beautifully illustrated and carefully written, the series combines the best of Ladybird content with the structured language progression that will help children develop their reading, writing, speaking, listening and critical thinking skills.

    The four levels of Readers and Activity Books follow the CEFR framework and include language activities that provide preparation for the Cambridge English: Young Learners (YLE) Starters, Movers and Flyers exams.

    Anansi Helps a Friend, a Level 1 Reader, is Pre-A1 in the CEFR framework and supports YLE Starters exams. Short sentences contain a maximum of two clauses, using the present tense and some simple adjectives.

     

    15.00

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